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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 1



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  5' *? The Western Front  Western Washington University Volume 116 Issue
16 Bellingham, Washington Alabama  crossing  debated  By Casey Little John 
THE WESTERN FRONT  The Bellingham City Council  will decide June 11 if a
build a  structure connecting the West  Railroad Trail across a busy
section  of Alabama Street.  Heavy traffic, a 35 mph speed  limit and a
steep grade make  crossing the road at Alabama and  Vining streets
difficult and  potentially dangerous.  "People have to be careful  there
very careful," City Council  Member Leslie Langdon said.  The city is
trying to provide an  interurban trail system that  gives people an
alternate route to  get to work or school, without  congesting roads or
polluting the  environment.  Fire in Higginson elevator  By Jen True  THE
WESTERN FRONT  Bellingham Fire Department  investigators suspect arson was 
the cause of a fire in the  Higginson dormitory elevator Wednesday that
melted the  plastic grate covering the light  bulbs.  Western student Logan
 Buttrell, who extinguished the  fire, said knee-high flames rose  from the
elevator floor and  greasy, black smoke billowed  from the elevator coach. 
He said he suspected burning  plastic dripped from the grate  where the 
fire originated.  After the fire department was  called, four fire trucks
arrived at  the scene.  University Residences director  Kay Rich said, "The
students  did a great job of evacuating the  building once the alarm went 
off."  Rich said the elevator was  cleaned Thursday and could be  certified
for use as soon as today.  A metal diffuser will replace  the damaged
plastic one, and  painting and floor repairs may  also be needed, she said.
 "We don't know how much it  will cost to repair it," Rich said.  After
investigating the fire,  the Bellingham fire investigator  found multiple
spots where heat  was applied.  This indicates arson, University Police
Assistant  Chief Dave Doughty said.  Arson is a felony offense,  Doughty
said. UP plans to continue  investigations regarding  See FIRE, Page 4  'We
have been trying to  connect the trail system  throughout the city, and 
this is d major link.'  Leslie Langdon  Bellingham City Council  Member "We
have been trying to connect  the trail system throughout  the city, and
this is a major link," Langdon said. "If we want people  to use the system,
we need to  have those links."  On May 24, the city of  Bellingham hosted
an open  house at Bloedel Donovan Park  to showcase landscape architect 
Robert W. Droll's numerous  See ALABAMA, Page 4  Paddle to the finish 
Chris Fuller/ The Western Front Members of team 343, Barron Heating,
approach the end of the canoe leg of the Ski to Sea race. The team won  its
third consecutive race with an overall time of 5:39:44..For race results
and related articles, see Page 14.  Rick Larsen speaks with students  By
Stacey Gorgen  THE WESTERN FRONT  United States Rep. Rick Larsen, D-Wash., 
spoke to Western students  Thursday on issues dealing with the unmet needs
of students at Western  such as loan concerns.  The recently formed
political club  Students  For Rick Larsen invited the  representative for a
day of in-class  lectures, which were followed by a student forum and
questions.  Larsen said $1,300 in funds the  government allotted for
student loans  has not reached Western.  "Twenty-seven percent of all
financial  aid and student loan needs go  unmet here  at Western, and
Congress  needs to respond to that," Larsen said.  Larsen said he is
working on student  loan issues. He said the student  loan interest
deduction payment  deadline was just changed from five  See LARSEN, Page 6 
Chris Fuller/  The Western  Front  Rep. Rick  Larsen, D-Wash., carefully 
listens  to a  student's  question  Thursday  evening  during a  question 
and answer  session in  Wilson  Library.  Investigation  of alleged  hate
crime  continues  By Jessica Sparks  THE WESTERN FRONT  Bellingham Police
are following  leads from last week's  alleged hate crime in which a 
23-year- old Pakistani man was  assaulted in the 1300 block of  North
Forest Street allegedly  because of his ethnicity.  The victim said that
after he  left a party Friday night he was  attacked by seven people. As a
result of the beating, he was  treated for three fractures on the  left
side of his face and one on his  nose Saturday at St. Joseph  Hospital. 
See HATE, Page 6  IN THIS ISSUE  Intramural Volleyball Championship  The
Swingers were  crowned intramural volleyball  champions Wednesday.  See
story, Pagel6.  Parrots have nothing  to do with it  Western's
improvisational  acting group  the Dead  Parrot's Society has  spiced up 
stages at  Western for  two years  See story, Page 10.  For news tips, call
(360) 650-3162 or e-mail The Western Front at wfront@cc.wwu.edu
http://westernfrontonline.com                           



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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 2



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   2 • The Western Front News June 1,2001  COPS BOX AP
WIRE NEWS BRIEFS  May 29,6:15 p.m.: Two bicy- 
••1HHHHBI  May 29,11:50 pan: Numerous 
SHiiKiiiHiNiP^^Siil^^^  STATE NEWS H^H^P^niH.....  IliiBiiiiMBHMIi^Wiiitti 
information to a police offi-  BpBiBillHIWI^^SiB  iiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^^isiHi
Sexual discrimination  lawsuit spurred by  insurance policies  SEATTLE
— Should a company's     employee health insurance 
policy be required to include  birth control pills? If it doesn't,  is the
company guilty of sexual  discrimination?  A federal judge tried to  answer
these questions  Wednesday afternoon in  Seattle.  Former Bartell drug
store  employee Jennifer Erickson is  suing the chain for violating a 
federal civil rights law. The law  prohibits employers from discriminating 
against women "on  the basis of pregnancy, childbirth  or related medical
conditions."  In Wednesday's hearing, both  prosecution and defense asked 
for a summary judgment — an  immediate decision.  Sealth
hits a rock  FRIDAY HARBOR — The  captain and helmsman
of the  state ferry Sealth have been  relieved of duty while the Coast 
Guard investigates a possible  grounding of the ferry.  State ferry
spokeswoman Pat  Patterson said the temporary  leave is standard procedure.
 Patterson said the ferry was  headed into Friday Harbor at  about 7:30
p.m. Tuesday from  Anacortes when it hit a submerged  object. It did not
come to  a stop,  and no one was injured.  Divers looked at the hull in 
Friday Harbor and found dents  and scrapes, but no punctures.  The Coast
Guard said the  impact damaged the engine cooling  system and two fuel
tanks. Fuel leaked into the bilge, but  the water was not poDuted. 
Patterson said the fuel tanks  have been pumped out, and the  ferry was
towed to Eagle Harbor  for repairs Wednesday.  The Evergreen state ferry
has  been brought in to maintain full  service in the San Juan Islands. 
Rendering truck loses load BELLINGHAM — A busy 
Bellingham street was partially  blocked noon Wednesday by a  smelly mess. 
A truck carrying more than  300 dead salmon from an  Anacortes fish farm
had a latch  pop open. A load of fish carcasses  spilled on the pavement of
 Meridian Street near Interstate  5.  After the driver pushed the  fish to
the side of the road, the  Bellingham Fire Department  hosed off the
street. Witnesses  said the  rotting mess could be  smelled several blocks
away.  The fish were being sent to a  rendering plant in Seattle to be 
made into fertilizer and dog  food.  NATIONAL NEWS  President's daughter 
under investigation for  buying alcohol underage  AUSTIN
— Authorities are  investigating whether President
George W. Bush's twin daughters,  Jenna and Barbara Bush,  both 19, tried
to buy alcohol as  minors. Police were called to a  Mexican restaurant
Tuesday  night by managers who said the  girls were allegedly  trying to 
buy alcohol.  Authorities said Jenna  allegedly tried to purchase the 
alcohol using someone else's ID.  They said Barbara did not.  Police are
investigating to  determine whether any charges  should be filed.  Less
than a month ago, Jenna  pleaded no contest to a minor in  possession of
alcohol charge. She was given community service  and told to take alcohol 
awareness classes.  INTERNATIONAL NEWS  Missing missile located  SWEDEN
— A Swedish surface-  to-air missile that disappeared
shortly after takeoff has  been found close to the launch  site.  Swedish
Defense Authority  spokesperson said the missile, a  live warhead,
malfunctioned  after it was fired during military  training exercises.  It
disappeared in the air,  prompting a four-hour search  for the weapon.  The
public was warned the  missile was loaded and dangerous.  It was found
intact 20 miles  from the test range.  No explanation has been  given for
the malfunction. The  military said the incident will be  investigated. 
Compiled by Brian Harrington  eather  Saturday  Rainy  62 - 45  Sunday 
Partly cloudy  60-47  Monday  Rainy  63-48 Tuesday  Rainy  63-47  l i i l i
i l i i i i i B l i  westernfrontonline.com  The Western Front is published
twice weekly in fall, winter and spring; once  a week in summer session.
Address: The Western Front, Western Washington  University, CH 110,
Bellingham, WA 98225-9100. The Western Front is  the official newspaper of
Western Washington University, published by the  Student Publications
Council, and is mainly supported by advertising.  Opinions and stories in
the newspaper have no connection with advertising.  News content is
determined by student editors. Staff reporters are enrolled  in a course in
the Department of Journalism, but any student enrolled at  Western may
offer stories to the editors. Advertising inquiries should be directed to
the business office in.  College Hall 07, or by phone to (360) 650-3161. 
Members of the Western community are entitled to a single free  copy of
each issue of The Western Front.  WWU Official Announcements  Deadline for
announcements in this space is noon Friday for the Tuesday edition and noon
Wednesday  for the Friday edition. Announcements should be limited to 50
words, typewritten or legibly printed, and  sent through campus mail to
"Official Announcements," MS - 9117, via fax to X/7287, or brought in 
person to Commissary 113A. DO NOT SEND ANNOUNCEMENTS DIRECTLY TO THE
WESTERN FRONT.  Phoned announcements will not be accepted. All
announcements should be signed by originator.  PLEASE POST '  FALL 2001
DEGREE APPLICANTS mast have a degree application on file in the registrar's
office,  OM 230, by June 8. Winter quarter applicants must have
applications on file by Aug. 24. Spring  quarter major evaluation is
advisable for winter applicants since many major advisers are unavailable 
summer quarter. Applications: OM 230. THE MATH PLACEMENT TEST will be
offered at 3 p.m. Mondays on June 4 and 11 and at 9 a.m. Thursdays on June
7 and 14. Registration is not required. Students must bring photo
identification, student number, Social Security number and a No. 2 pencil.
A $10 fee is payable in the exact  amount at time of testing. Allow 90
minutes. Sample problems may be found at  www.washington.edu/oea/aptp.htm. 
THE MILLER ANALOGIES TEST (MAT) will be administered at 2 p.m. June 5 in OM
120. Registration, limited to 16 students, is required in OM 120 or by
calling X/3080. A $35 fee is payable at test  time. Not administered on an
individual basis. Test takes about 90 minutes.  SUMMER SESSION 2001.
Planning your summer schedule? Visit the summer session Web site, 
www.wwu.edu/~summer under "classes" to see the most up-to-date summer
course descriptions  and timetable. For more information, contact
summer.session@wwu.edu or call X/2841. Summer  session begins June 26. 
KEEP YOUR WESTERN CARD. Students, faculty and staff are reminded to keep
their Western Card  for the duration they are affiliated with the
University. Once registered for fall quarter, students can  go to the Card
Office, EH 108, to receive a validation stamp for the 2001 -2002 school
year.  INFORMATION REGARDING NATIONAL TESTING is available at the Testing
Center, OM 120.  THE LAST WESTERN FRONT OF SPRING QUARTER will be published
on June 8. Official Announcements  are due at noon Wednesday for Friday
editions and noon Friday for Tuesday editions.  Announcements may be sent
by e-mail to pubs@cc.wwu.edu, clearly marked for Official  Announcements or
to MS-9117. There is a 50-word limit. CAN'T FIT THOSE LAST COUPLE CREDITS
into your schedule this summer? Take an online course through Woodring
Extension Services. There is no specific class time to
meet—fit your education  around  your schedule. For
detailed information, call X/3308 or X/3717, send e-mail to
Professional.Development@wwu.edu, or visit
www.wce.wwu.edu/Resources/CRS/ContinuingEd.html.                           
              



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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 3



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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 4



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  4 • The Western Front News June 1,2001  Bellingham City
Council to choose design for new crossing on Alabama  From ALABAMA, Page 1 
design options.  The event provided the public  with information about the
project,  and the council gained input  from the community about the 
designs.  7 don't like the  cage  because it infringes the  view for people
on the  bridge, as well as on the  road.'  Darol Strieb Bellingham resident
 An advisory committee comprised  of representatives from the 
neighborhood, the Arts  Commission, Public Works, Parks  and Recreation,
the Planning  Department and the Bellingham Police Department selected the 
alternatives presented to the  public last week, said Rory  Routhe of the
Public Works  Department.  About 15 options existed to  begin with. Routhe
said the advisory committee narrowed it down  to a three, Routhe said.  The
main designs being considered  are a tunnel (underpass), an  angled bridge,
featuring fills and  retaining walls at each end of the  bridge and a
bridge with an elevated  walkway on each side,  extending to the ends of
the existing  trail.  "From what we've heard, the  overpass with the
elevated trail is  the one we're . leaning  towards,"Routhe said. "It's the
  most aesthetically pleasing, and  it's financially equivalent to the 
other designs."  Both the. angled and elevated  overpass options are
projected to  cost $1.6 to $1.9 million.  Either walkway could use any  of
the proposed bridge designs,  such as an arch, concrete girder  or cable
bridge.  The plans differ mostly in the  way the structure would be
supported  at the ends of the bridge,  Droll explained.  "The angled bridge
would  cause more ground disturbance,  requiring more trees to be taken 
down," Droll said. "The difference  between the two is the long-term 
impacts."  All the bridge designs at the  public viewing featured some 
type of cage enclosing the bridge.  "I don't like the cage because it 
infringes the view for people on  the bridge, as well as on the  road,"
Bellingham resident Darol  Strieb said. "It's a bit much. I like  a lower
profile bridge."  Routhe said the city has not  decided whether to place a
cage  over the bridge.  "The city risk assessment manager  hasn't formally
required it,  but we'll probably need one," he   said.  The tunnel is
estimated to be  the least expensive option, costing  $1.4 million, but
presents some safety concerns that could  make it undesirable, such as
traffic  disruptions caused by construction  and the possibility of  having
to relocate buried utility  lines.  "The biggest issue of the underpass  is
the perception that there  is a lack of safety," Droll said.  Droll
explained how the tunnel     is engineered to be safe, especially  at
night.  "It (the tunnel) has a minus  five degree grade, is 16 feet wide 
and 88 feet long," he said. "That  enables a person that stands 5.5  feet
tall to see all the way to the  other side of the tunnel before  entering,
giving them the option  of going through it or not."  The project is a part
of the city's  six-year transportation plan.  Water conservation tips 
•Shave, brush teeth and wash   hands and hair with a 
stopper in the sink.  •Take showers lasting two  minutes
or less.  •Run only full loads of dishes  in the
dishwasher.  •Wash dishes in the sink by  hand. 
•Repair broken faucets and  toilets as soon as possible. 
•Clean the sidewalk, driveway  and patio with a broom. 
•Use a bucket of soapy water  to wash vehicles. 
•Prevent children from playing  with water. 
•Use trickle or drip irrigation to  water trees, shrubs
or hilly  areas.  •Collect runoff water for  garden use. 
Source: Ronald.E Hermanson, Washington State University Cooperative
Extension  Casey Little John/ The Western Front  Cars race past the West
Railroad Trail.  Higginson Hall fire possible arson  From FIRE, Page 1  the
incident, he said.  Buttrell said quarter sized  singe marks showed where
vandals previously used lighters to  burn the plastic grate.  'The students
did a great  job of evacuating the  building  once the alarm  went off.' 
Kay Rich  University Residences director  He said vandals have previously
stuffed other things, such  as ice cream cones and other  food in its
crevices.  The janitors posted notes in   the elevator requesting students 
to stop breaking or unscrewing  the light bulbs, Buttrell said.  "We
believe it was an act of  vandalism that got out of  hand,"Rich said.  If
found, the vandal would be  removed  from the dorms and  possibly expelled
from Western,  Rich said.  If charged, an arsonist could  face fines and
possibly prison  time, Doughty said.  Sound Electric employee  Steve
Richards said elevator  fires are extremely rare.  Western employs Sound 
Electric to service Western's  elevators, Richards said, adding that Sound
Electric installed the  Higginson elevator during the  1950s.  A faulty
lamp switch sparked  a fire in the Mathes dorm, burning  several rooms in
November  1997. The Higginson fire was  minor in comparison, Rich said. 
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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 5



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   June 1,2001 News The Western Front • 5  Spring sun
invites health risks, ACA says  By Candace Nelson  THE WESTERN FRONT  The
sun is out and students are  enjoying the feeling of the warmth  on their
sun-deprived skin by taking  breaks on campus lawns or in  Red Square. At
the end of the day, though, their skin is sometimes  burned.  Dr. Warren
Howe of St. Joseph  Hospital said he has recently seen  many cases of
sunburn in his  office. The reason most students  get burned is because
they are not   limiting their time in the sun, he  said.  Howe said the
first exposure to  sun in the spring should be short.   "A sunburn is a
burn," Howe  said. "It's destructive to tissue. A  burn is among the most
damaging injuries to the body."  According to statistics from the  American
Cancer Association,  skin cancer is the most common of  all cancer.
Melanoma accounts for  about 4 percent of skin cancer  cases but causes
about 79 percent  of skin cancer deaths.  More than 1.3 million cases of 
skin cancer have been reported this year, according to ACA statistics. 
"Sun tanning is really gross  when you think about it, because essentially
it is your skin cells sacrificing  themselves to save your  inner organs
from frying,"  Western junior Nicole Ayers said.  Howe said protective
factors  such as a 25 sun protection factor  sunblock, white      T-shirts
or clothing  that will reflect the sun's rays  should be worn.  "It takes
about 30 minutes for sunblock to protect the skin," said  Katrina Finnegan,
community  cancer control manager in  Spokane. Christina Schrum/ The
Western Front  Students should be cautious when sun bathing, Community
Cancer  Control manager Katrina Finnegan said. Students  should be aware of
any change in appearance of moles  on their skin. On sunny days, students
enjoy sun bathing next  to Fisher Fountain in Red Square.  For most, a
sunburn is minor,  Howe said. It is painful and makes  people
uncomfortable. Sunburns  generally feel better after a couple  of days, he
said.  'Sun tanning is really gross  when you think about it  because
essentially it is  your skin cells sacrificing  themselves to save your 
inner organs from frying.'  Nicole Ayers  Western student  Many of Howe's
patients soothe  Experiencing Western on Web  By Joshua Porter  THE WESTERN
FRONT  Western's student gratification,  retention, employment and 
graduation  rates are some of the  highlights of "10 Reasons to Love 
Western," featured on a new university  Web site, "The Western 
Experience."  Jo Collinge, assistant director  of the Public Information
Office,  said the site was aimed at a more  general audience, rather than 
just students, and explains more  of Western's philosophy.  "It's a unified
message of what  we are about," Collinge said.  Posted at the beginning of
May, "The Western Experience"  was developed with cooperation  from
Academic Technology and  User Services (ATUS) and the  PIO.  Printed
material, from which  the Web site is based, was mailed  to alumni, members
of the community  and legislators earlier  this year before'Western's
budget  was decided in Olympia.  Kathy Sheehan, director of  publications
for the PIO, called  the project a "cooperative effort."  She said that
Justina Brown,  with help from ATUS, was  instrumental in programming   the
site, while PIO staff developed  the functional design of the  site.
Western students  did have some involvement  with the site, but creation of
the  page came directly from ATUS  and the PIO.  Several pages in the
"Partners  in Excellence" section in 'The  Western Experience" site are 
devoted to exploring the com-,  bined efforts in teaching and  learning,
community involvement  and how the Western Foundation helps finance
education.  "The Western Experience" also  provides information about
alumni, parent and student  involvement.  The section contains quotes  and
experiences from Western past and present students, and  explains what
makes Western  the way it is.  National and international recognition of
Western's achievements  and notoriety is featured  in "What Are People
Saying  about Western?"  "Ten Reasons to Love WWU"  and "Western at a
Glance" detail  information for. prospective students,  such as Western's
national  reputation, its size and student-to-  professor ratio and its
commitment  to diversity.  The section "Western at a  glance" explains
basic facts about  Western, and also outlines  Western statistics,
location,  administration and departments.  "The Western Experience"  can 
be found either by clicking on the  "About Western" tab on Western's  home
page or directly at www. w wu. edu/depts/pio/about.  a mild sunburn with an
over-the-counter  treatment such as  Noxzema. For especially sore  areas,
ice packs help.  If the burn is blistering or  extremely uncomfortable,
people should see a-doctor, Howe said.  Sunburns increase the chance of 
developing malignant melanoma,  a deadly form of skin cancer.  If melanoma
is discovered early,  it is curable. If it is not discovered,  it can
spread throughout the body,  Finnegan said.  Melanoma commonly originates 
near a mole. It is often black or  brown and sometimes has red or  blue
portions.  "Any change in appearance of  the mole (is a warning sign), it 
could be a change in the color or  the border," Finnegan said.  People with
fair skin, freckles,  light hair or those who sunburn  easily have the
highest risk of  developing skin cancer, Finnegan   said.  The benefit of
tanning beds is  that only 6 percent of burning rays  (UVB) are transmitted
rather than the 100 percent from outdoors,  Salon Safari employee  Linda
Lagerwey said.  Light therapy from the beds  helps with winter depression, 
Lagerwey said, and the light provides  vitamin D for the skin. Although no
long-term studies  have been done on the effects of  tanning beds, Howe
said they are  still an  unnecessary exposure to  ultraviolet light.  'TJV
light is a mutating agent,"  Howe said. "It changes the DNAin  cells." 
People think of golden skin as  healthy, but "any tanning of the  skin is
sun damage," Finnegan  said.  Basal cell carcinoma is the most  common kind
of skin cancer. It is  not usually life threatening, but it  can destroy
tissue.  It usually starts as a small, shiny  bump on the head, neck or
hand.  Sqamous cell carcinoma usually  develops as red patches on the face 
or ears. If left untreated, it can  become large and spread to other  parts
of the body, according to  ACA's pamphlet.  It may take a few hours for a 
sunburn to show, Howe said.  "Be aware of the delay period  and avoid
sleeping in the sun," he  said.  New degree links Western  with Northwest
Indian College  By Ken Jager  THE WESTERN FRONT  The Northwest Indian
College  received more than $1 million in  grants from the federal
government  for a degree program linking  the NWIC and Western, but  the
issue of native tribal under- representation  on campus still  exists,
Western student Lenny  Dixon said.  7 would rather see more understanding
of tribal  communities in general on  campus at Western.'  Lenny Dixon 
Huxley College student  The Tribal Environmental  and Natural Resources 
Management (TENRM) associate  degree program at NWIC  gives Native American
students  at the college a direct way to  transfer to Western. "Western
helped us tailor our  associate's degree so .that our  graduates meet all
the requirements  to enter Huxley College of  Environmental Studies at the 
junior level," TENRM program  director Phil Duran said.  The agreement
between  Western and NWIC is similar to  Washington state's direct transfer
agreement, which allows students  who earn an associate's  degree at a
state community college  to have automatic admittance  to any state public
four-year  college.  The first five students graduated from the two-year
program  last year, and four transferred to  Western, with the others
planning  to attend Western next  year.  Dixon, a Northwest Indian  College
TENRM graduate, is a  junior at Huxley studying environmental  planning and
policy.  "It was nice because we did a  lot of field work in our classes," 
Dixon said. "In our geology class  we took four field trips that  included
a trip to Mount Baker and Deming to look at streams  and such."  Dixon is
also the Lummi  Nation water resources planner,  on two committees for
Huxley  College, a member of the  Whatcom Human Rights Task  Force and on
the budget committee  for the Lummi Nation.  As much as Dixon said he
relishes  the TENRM program and  the relationship between the  NWIC and
Western, he said he  still thinks Western underrepre-sents the native
community as a  whole.  'Western helped us tailor  our associate's degree
so  that our graduates meet all  the requirements to enter  Huxley College
of  Environmental Studies at  the junior level.'  Phil Duran  TENRM program
director  "I would rather see more  understanding of tribal communities  in
general on campus at  Western," he said. "I think there  should be a core
requirement for  any environmental degree to  learn about native treaty
rights  at least."  Dixon also said Western students  as a group, not just
environmental  studies students,  aren't educated enough about the rights
of the tribal communities.  "There is not a clear concept of  the native
community on campus,"  he  said. "There needs to be  more information
available.  . See DEGREE, Page 6                                           
        



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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 6



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  6 • The Western Front News June 1, 2001  NWIC partners
with Western  From DEGREE, from page 5 "There is a lot of discussion  on
treaties such as NATO and  the WTO but not enough about  native treaties
and rights," he  said. "When someone found out  that I was a Native
American,  they asked if I ever lived in a  teepee and stuff like that. We 
never had teepees in the  Northwest recently, so it's an issue of getting
awareness to  those who don't understand,  tribal history."  'The Western
professors  have the expertise that our  teachers don't have.'  Phil Duran 
TENRM program director  The program originated in  1997 when the NWIC
received  a $750,000 grant from the  National Science Foundation.  After
one year  of putting the  curriculum together, the  TENRM program was
available  to students, beginning in  1998.  The grant also provided for 
two Western professors to  teach at NWIC.  "The Western professors  have
the expertise that our  teachers don't have," Duran  said.  Gigi Bernardi,
environmental  studies chair at Western  and TENRM professor, said the 
tribal students' education  would not infringe on the customs of their
tribe.  "While at Huxley, they work  with some of the same TENRM  faculty
and are permitted to exit and return to the program  for personal and
cultural reasons,  such as attending ceremonies  or fishing season," 
Bernardi said.  The other Western professor  teaching at the NWIC is Lynn 
Robbins, who teaches political  science and native treaty laws.  Last year,
the program  received another boost from  the  government. The NSF supplied
 an additional $589,000 grant to  maintain the program.  "This partnership
between  the NWIC and Western is a  national model that is being  closely
monitored by a number  of agencies in Washington,  D.C.," Huxley College
Dean  Bradley Smith said.  Duran said he hopes the two  colleges will
continue to  expand its relationship in the  future.  Rick Larsen talks
education  with Western students  From LARSEN, Page 1  years to an
unlimited time  frame.  The student loan interest  deduction previously
stated that  students who apply for student  loans must pay back the
interest  on the loan within five years of  the date the loan was taken. 
Larsen said students will no  longer have the stress of paying  back all
student loans in such a  short time.  Larsen said this will be a huge
relief for students because the  five-year deadline now requires  students
to concentrate more on employment concerns than education.  More students
are forced to  become "super seniors," prolonging  their education by
taking  fewer classes per quarter to  ensure they work enough hours  to pay
back any loans because  payback deadlines are  approaching.  Larsen is also
concerned with  higher education and the drug  act.  He said this law
states any  federal drug offense a person  may have on his order record 
limits the chance of receiving  financial aid.  Education no.1  Chris
Fuller/ The Western Front  Rick Larsen explains his five-year deadline for
student loans.  Whatcom County Sheriff's Office investigates possible leads
in suspected hate crime  From HATE, Page 1  The victim remained at the
hospital * for a couple of days.  Upon his victim's release, the victim's 
lawyer, Malcolm H. Oliver,  said the victim felt much better.  Partygoer
Lyndsay Wilhelm  said she saw two groups of men  begin to fight at  the
party, adding  that the victim was part of one of  those groups.  Both
groups were told to leave  the     party, and they resumed the  fight
outside in the street, she  said.  Wilhelm said at this point a  large
group formed around the  victim and shouted racial slurs.  Wilhelm said she
wasn't sure  whether the fight was racially  motivated or who had started
the  argument.  The crime is being investigated  as a malicious assault. 
Police said they couldn't comment  on details concerning suspects  or
arrests without compromising  the investigation, Sgt.  Colin Emmet said. 
'My goal is to keep him  focused and upbeat and to  make sure his goals are
 still clear.'  Malcolm H. Oliver  Victim's lawyer  "My goal is to keep him
focused  and upbeat and to make sure his  goals are still clear," Oliver
said.  "They (the victim and his family)  are not running away just 
because this incident occurred.  They plan to stay here to make changes to
address this issue of  hate."  The assault of the Pakistani  man is the
first hate crime reported  to police this year.  Three hate crimes were
reported  to police in 2000.  Two of them included insults  and racial
slurs sent by mail to a  black person and a Jewish group.  The other hate
crime  involved  vandalism where anti-homosexual  words were spray painted
on  the victim's door. In all three cases, the offender was unknown. 
Police said many more so-called  hate crimes occur than are  reported.  
Robin Elwood from the  Whatcom Human Rights Task  Force said many factors
contribute  to people's  reluctance to  report hate crimes.  'Many people
fear reporting  hate crimes because  they don't trust the police  or they
fear a future attack  on them or their family for  speaking out.'  Robin
Elwood  Whatcom Human Rights Task  Force  "Many people fear reporting  hate
crimes because they don't  trust the police, or they fear a  future attack
on them or their  family for speaking out," Elwood  said.  Many people
don't identify  name calling, harassment,  threats or insulting words as
hate  crimes so they don't get reported, Elwood said. Instead, the student 
in high school who is constantly  harassed because of his/her sexuality 
tries to shrug it off.  "Hate crimes are our departmental  priority," Emmet
said.  "They are not treated like other  cases. They rise to the top of the
 response ladder."  In Whatcom County, 13 hate crimes have been reported
since  1998, Sheriffs Office Deputy  Doug Dahl said.  Crimes relating to
race, color,  religion, ancestry, national origin,  gender and mental,
physical and  sensory handicaps fit into the category  of malicious
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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 8



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  8 • The Western Front  CCENT  Arts   Entertainment June
1,2001  ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 1 ^ ^ ^ ^ ^   
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Bemtid iefiaitfel  Love, kids and the F-word'  By Emily Christianson  THE
WESTERN FRONT  Five kids (three adopted, two foster), nine cats, one dog
and Obsessive-  Compulsive Disorder make the special concoction needed for
award-winning  comedienne and single mom Paula Poundstone.  Poundstone, who
is from Santa Monica, Calif., performed Saturday night at the Mount Baker
Theatre in Bellingham. Well-known for finding  humor in everyday life, she
shared personal experiences with the crowd  about parent-teacher
conferences, cats eating rubber bands and her need  to clean.  'To me, the
best comedians are the ones who can take the day to day  stuff and expand
out from it," Bellingham resident Dan Radii said.  In her pinstripe suit
and red vest, she admitted she has a  hard time  dressing in anything more
formal because her unruly hair draws too  much attention. Instead, she said
she prefers to wear outfits that will  leave the audience questioning her
entire fashion sense and not just her  tousled locks.  The audience may
have been questioning a little more than that when  she explained her
parenting techniques, which include allowing her children  to swear. 
"We've picked words (in society) you can't say," Poundstone said. "If you 
get offended by words, you must have a really exhaustive day."  Although
swearing might be allowed in her house, apparently her chil  dren's schools
do not agree. Poundstone said she told school administra  tors to stop
calling her just because her child swore in class. She also said  she tried
to convince one of her daughters to say "fuck" instead of "here" during
class roll call because it was a good way to get attention.  "She could use
the F-word and get laughs, and she used it in good  taste," Bellingham
resident Dean Hendrickson said.  Her amusing (but almost too realistic)
imitation of a cat coughing up  a fur ball set her off on a tangent of
rubber-band-and- curly-ribbon-addicted  cats and their mission to break
into a secure cabinet below the  sink.  "If you don't have kids, then at
least you have a cat," Radii said. "There  is something in her act you can
relate to." Poundstone spoke of her struggles with Obsessive-Compulsive 
Disorder and described how she saw the disorder's effect on her life  when
she started taking medication.  "It's like someone had gone over my entire
life with a yellow highlighter  pen," Poundstone said.  She said the
disorder causes her to want to clean constantly and may  be keeping her
from completing her first book.  "I walk around my house with a damp cloth
in a holster," Poundstone  said. "I can't write until everything is clean
and organized." Poundstone's career has taken her a little farther than
Meridian  Street. She has been getting laughs since  1979 and has since won
an  American Comedy Award and two Cable Ace Awards, as well as making guest
appearances at a White House Correspondents Dinner, "The Rosie  O'Donnell
Show," "The Tonight Show" and "Sesame Street."  Poundstone ended her night
of comedy in Bellingham laying on her  back, staring at the ceiling and
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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 10



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  10 • The Western Front Accent June 1,2001  What've
parrots got to do with it?  By Jen True  THE WESTERN FRONT  Like a pack of
hibernating bears, seven men  and one woman lay in a pile on Mathes' main 
lounge floor.  One man lay on his stomach with his butt  arched toward the
ceiling like a sleeping 2-  year-old. The group appeared peaceful, mumbling
 sentence fragments from dreams about  baseball until a small alarm
interrupted the  slumber. In slow motion, the group members  rose to their
feet to attack  the alarm. The disruption  eventually led to a slow motion
brawl  until each group member was strangled,  pushed or tripped to the
ground again.  F. Tyler Burnet, veteran member and coach  of Western's
improvisational theater group the  Dead Parrot's Society, followed the
brawl and  addressed the 170 audience members by saying,  "Having a script
for this would be stupid."  Dead Parrot's Society challenged the 
University of Washington improv group The  Collective, in their first
intercollegiate improvisation  competition May 24 at Western.  Judges
scored the teams on quality of perfor-  " Essentially (improvisation)  is
not easy"  F. T gt;ler Burnet  Dead Parrot's Society member  mance and    
attention to rules, Burnet said.  Points were also awarded for winning
elimination  games.  Rather than utilizing traditional theater  scripts or
standup comedy routines, the improvisation  teams let audience suggestions
shape  their actions.  "The reason I enjoy it is because it is about  group
mind and audience participation," The  Collective member Adam Dow said. "It
is very  close to a wrestling match in that a lot of (energy)  is built off
of the audience."  Dead Parrot's Society challenged The  Collective to play
Hot.Seat. In the game, an  audience member suggested the song N'Sync's 
"Bye, Bye, Bye," while a player from The  Collective was out of hearing
range. The  Collective member returned from the "hot seat" and tried to
guess the suggested title while he  and his teammates acted a scene set at
a construction site.  The "hot seat" player incorporated the guesses  into
dialogue, sending audience members  into chesty laughs and giggles.
Although the song  was never guessed correctly, the scene received  the
loudest audience response of the night.. Jennifer Collins/The Western Front
 Creating a trusting relationship between (Above) Members of Western's
student improvisational group Dead Parrot's Society fight in slow motion 
performers is the key to allowing spontaneity a t a n impromptu sketch in
the sunshine Thursday. (Below) Peter Johnson, David Bestock and F. Tyler 
ana coherent story lines, Dead Parrots Society
•» . ^«."i« u i
• J t« gt;
•• •
*•_ • " • *
• Ii_ J- L- ki. •
•••_•
 gt;* ** •  member Peter Johnson said Burnet hold Lindsay
Wellever in as they point in  the direction the Invisible Man ran off in. 
While it may seem ironic to have rehearsals -. "Essentially (improvisation)
is not easy," Burnet said to the audience,  for improvisation, Johnson said
Dead Parrot's Society practices twice a week. Improvisers strive to develop
stories with a beginning, middle and end, Dead  ,The rehearsals help the
actors develop confidence, follow leads started by fellow Parrot's Society
member David Bestock said.  improvisers and practice improvisation formats.
/ "One thing we have constantly struggled with is advancing the stories," 
Bestock said about Growing and Shrinking, one of the  35 games Dead 
Parrot's Society plays during performances.  ; Growing and Shrinking
started with a one- person scene, A second  actor said "freeze" and entered
the stage initiating a second story plot.  The process is repeated until
all the players are on stage.  The shrinking occurs after the last person
enters the stage and his or  her scene is concluded.  In reverse order the
scenes are finished and their initiator has left the  stage. The game
finishes with the original one-person act.  When playing Growing and
Shrinking, the improvisers need to practice  leaving the middle section of
each story plot open for audience  imagination, Bestock said.  The group
forms its agenda for each show by pulling game titles out   of a hat,
Burnet said. Sometimes a character will reappear or "pop up"  in each
scene. He said Dead Parrot's Society calls this format "The  Bunny."  The
group began performing last spring and has continued  to put on  between
three and five shows per quarter, but this was its first improv 
competition this year, Burnet said.  Next year Dead Parrot's Society
members said they hope to host a second  intercollegiate  competition
during the Kennedy Center American  Theater Festival in the Northwest. Dead
Parrot's Society will perform 9  p.m. Wednesday at the Nash Hall Mainstage.
                        



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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 11



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   June 1, 2001 Accent The Western Front • 11  Fairhaven 
Bellinghamites celebrate Ski to Sea Festival at  the finish line Sunday  By
Jen True  THE WESTERN FRONT  Ten-year-old Dylan Albrecht climbed into a
Human Gyro, an  amusement ride located in the middle of the historic
Fairhaven district.  He gripped the  handlebars on the innermost of three
circular  bars and began-to spin. -  "It felt like (the bars) were going to
hit you in the face," Albrecht  said, dismounting the ride with a big grin
on his face.  Albrecht and his family were among the crowd celebrating the 
end of the 28th annual Ski to Sea race Sunday at "It All Ends in 
Fairhaven."  The festivities, which were sponsored by the Fairhaven 
Association, included food, arts, live music, children's entertainment, 
vendor booths and a beer garden.  Information booth attendant  Frank Howell
said the event generally  draws 20,000-25,000 people.  Blocks of cars were
parked along State Street, and others circled  the neighborhoods streets.
Capitalizing on the crowd, two teenage  girls sold lemonade as people
migrated to and from their cars. When  no one was buying, the girls giggled
and danced behind their booth  to music by N'Sync.  Most people skipped the
lemonade and went straight to the food  kiosks where the smell of barbecue,
hamburgers, pizza and Greek,  Thai and Italian dishes beckoned at
passersby. Others packed a  chainlink fence enclosure that housed a beer
garden.  "(It All Ends in Fairhaven) has changed from a college beer blast 
to a family affair," vendor Pat Hicks said.  Hicks  said the Fairhaven
Association focused the event away  from the beer garden and toward
community and entertainment.  In front of the music stage, about 50 people,
ranging from children  to grandparents, twisted their knees and elbows to
"Twistin," performed  by The Walrus.  Pointing to the dancers, Bellingham
resident Mary Osterhaos  said, "It is what brings together the Whatcom
County."  Osterhaos     rocked her hips to the music as The Walrus played a
 number of Beatles covers.  "Everyone knows the music they are playing,"
Osterhaos said,  explaining why she liked the group.  "It is like a mini
Folklife Festival," Western student Carrie  Danielson said, referring to
the event that took place last weekend  in Seattle.  Danielson said she
spent most of her time socializing with friends  in the beer garden but
added that she also likes looking at the vendors  and joining the crowds to
cheer the Ski to Sea teams crossing  the finish line at Marine Park.  "I
have come down here for years," Bellingham resident Kevin Johnson said
while looking out into the bay as several kayakers  landed on the shore.
"You cheer for the first one and then laugh at  the funny (team) names." 
After beaching their boats, the kayakers ran up the beach onto  the park
cliff and under an archway. A bell hung from the archway  to signify the
end of the race.  Dripping wet, Bruce McNeil, a tanned man with a gray
beard,  rang the finish line bell.  "It is a great high," McNeil said after
he caught his breath. "The  best."  Chris Fuller/ The Western Front 
(Above) Erica Feild experiences the stomach churning joys of the Human
Gyroscope at  "It all ends in Fairhaven," during  Ski to Sea weekend. (Top)
Kids choo choo around  Fairhaven in a child-sized circus train.            
     



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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 12



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  12 • The Western Front Accent June 1, 2001  Reaching
for notes in Fairhaven Auditorium  music.  Ken Jager/ The Western Front 
Janet Jensen portrays the character Katisha, expressing anguish  in "The
Mikado" operetta Wednesday at the Fairhaven Auditorium.  A hip to the 
Alicia Franklin  THE WESTERN FRONT  Mikado, a round and robust ruler, stood
 over three trembling subjects. The three lay  face down, frantically
discussing how to bring  the Mikado's son back to life. They had pretended 
to kill him because the Mikado had  ordered an execution. These were scenes
dur:  ing a production of Gilbert and Sullivan's  operatic comedy, "The
Mikado."  "The Mikado," performed by  The Friends of Fairhaven | | | l l l
l  l l l i l l i il  Players, shows through  Sunday in the Fairhaven 
Auditorium. The show starts  at 8 p.m. and costs $5 for  admission.
Admission benefits  The Friends of Fairhaven  Players.  Gilbert and
Sullivan wrote  "The Mikado" and other Victorian era operatic  comedies.
Gilbert wrote the text for all their productions. Sullivan wrote the
rhythms and  composed the scores. The humor in "The  Mikado" is as relevant
today as it was more  than a century ago.  The production was well-sung.
The singers  were -well- rehearsed and talented.  Loren Lundholm, who
played Pooh-Bah,  said "The Mikado" can appeal to 3-year- olds  because of
the costumes. The costumes for  this production were bits and pieces of
clothing  put together by the cast.  Several kimonos from Japan added to
the  wardrobes of the characters, helping to make  costumes more authentic.
 The costumes were colorful and attention  grabbing, as well as fitting of
the character's  personalities.  The cast is composed of Western faculty,
students  and staff. The driving  force behind the  "We were true to the 
Kamalla Rose  Assistant director of "The  Mikado"  group is David T. Mason,
an actor and one of  the founders of Fairhaven College.  "David retired
three years ago, but he still  directs," Rose said.  Mason has performed in
Gilbert and  Sullivan plays for 20 years with the Friends of  Fairhaven
Players. Repetition of former productions  are hardly necessary for the
troupe as  Gilbert and Sullivan together wrote 14  comedic operas, and
Gilbert wrote a total of 63  plays.  Some of the students in the  play get
academic credits for  their efforts. David Betz-Zall  said he was getting
one credit  for his role as Ko-Ko.  He said he endures an  intense
preparation, doing his  makeup for more than 20 minutes before each 
performance.  A four-member orchestra played the overture.  The conductor's
bushy beard and coat-tails  bobbed in unison with his hand as he conducted 
the overture.  "We were true to the music," assistant director  Kamalla
Rose said.  The director modernized the opera in the actions of the actors
and the dialogue.  "They made their productions to be changed  with the
times," said Robert Muzzy, who  played the Mikado.  Gilbert and Sullivan
were prone to changing  their productions themselves even just for one 
performance.  A soft Japanese-style brush painting provided  the backdrop
of the town of Titipu. Live  bamboo plants and a small sculpture completed 
the scenery. The small stage didn't allow for  elaborate set design. The
cast did some of the  acting right in the audience, which is  quite an 
experience.  By Eric Berto  THE WESTERN FRONT  Hip-hop heads from
throughout Washington  and parts of Canada will descend upon  Western's
campus at 2 p.m. Saturday when  Black Eyed Peas headlines a bumpin' show in
 Red Square.  BEP, touring to promote its second album, "Bridging the Gap,"
will headline a show featuring  many current big names in hip-hop,
including  Mix Master Mike of the Beastie Boys,  Aceyalone, Swollen Members
and Prospect  Champions.  BEP's Will.LAm, Apl.d.Ap and Taboo will flow  on
the mic, along with its four-piece band and  stunning backup singer, Kim
Hill.  The success of BEP and its rhythmic flow  between three MCs has 
allowed for groups such  as Los Angeles-based  Jurassic 5 to break into 
the scene.  Coming from Los  Angeles, BEP members  WilLIAm  Black Eyed Peas
 'Black Eyed Peas has the power to be  able to create music, and. through
that  power we hope we can influence people  aren't about represent- in a
positive Way."  ing their "hood" or  claiming what gang  they are from.
They are  in it for the music.  "People got special powers," Will.LAm 
stressed on the group's Web site. "Black Eyed  Peas has the power to be
able to create music,   and through that power we hope we can influence 
people in a positive way."  "People like Jay-Z are in it for.the money and 
the fame," Western student Kenny Roe said. "All  of these guys are here
because they love music."  The movement away from the "gangsta" rap  era of
the '90s has allowed for more soulful acts  such as BEP and Aceyalone to
break through  and reword their music.  "I'm going because of Aceyalone,"
Roe said. "He  is the originator of West  Coast underground."  "I wanted
something  for     everybody," event,  coordinator Kris Kierulff  said. "I
want to see the  die-hard heads as well as  the general  population."  Mix
Master Mike,  whose credits include  work on the Beastie Boys' album "Hello
Nasty" and numerous solo efforts, brings with him tight  beats and tight
rhymes that generally have  crowds getting down and grooving to the beat. 
Swollen Members, coming out of Vancouver  British Columbia, brings with it
thick bass  lines and deep keys that  accentuate the raspy  voice of Mad
Child and  the deep  vocals of  Prevail. Swollen  Members' rhymes reveal  a
psyche that is deep  and thoughtful, yet  rowdy and rugged.  , Local group
Prospect  Champions represents the growing Bellingham  scene.  DJ Intlect
spins the beats for Serge-1, who is  known for his freestyle rhymes.  This
bill, which varies in backgrounds and  styles, is a great way to represent
all aspects of  hip-hop, Kierulff said.  "All of these groups tell
stories," freshman  Tyler Wong said. "This is all from the heart. I bet 
Photo courtesy Tar a Canova  Black Eyed Peas headlines a show Saturday in
Red Square.  TJSBD©  people will walk away pleasantly
surprised."  ,cwn  ejjsodiuo;                                



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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 13



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  June 1, 2001 Accent The Western Front • 13  winging
on...  By Alicia Franklin  THE WESTERN FRONT   Jazzy brass band music 
seemed to tug at people's  feet, begging them to dance.  Couples twirled on
the  dance  floor, their feet moving in  unison through the complex  steps
of the Lindy Hop dance  style.  "It's a  good place to meet  people,"
Western student  Nathan Rust said at the May  19 swing dance at the Eagles 
Hall, hosted by Western's  Swing Kids. "It's a hell of a  lot of fun to
dance. I'm in it  for the girls, because you  can't meet girls at bars or 
clubs without sounding like  you are trying to take them  home." Swing Kids
hosts fundrais-  Photo courtesy Corbis.com ing events two to three times  A
woman swings her partner during a Per year T h e $5 e n t ry f ee f o r 
Lindy Hop-style move in the 1940s. a dance Pa^s for t h e sound  gear, CDs,
rent, workshops  and weekly lessons, Rust  said.  "It's hard to get
started,  but pretty soon you're  addicted, and you'11 be  doing it the
rest of your  lifer  Tanda Jacobsen  Swing dancer Swing Kids was the 
largest club on campus until  this fall's construction on the  Viking Union
left it without a  venue for the dances. Swing  Kids hosts Lindy Hop swing 
dancing lessons and small  dances each Wednesday in  the Fairhaven College 
Lounge.  Tanda Jacobsen lives in  Seattle and came to the dance because she
said  everyone else she knew was.  She said she has been doing  the Lindy
Hop for four years.  Jacobsen said she does several  types of dance, and
the  Lindy is one of the hardest.  It took her six weeks of  lessons to
learn the basic  steps, and from there, she  said, it builds on itself. 
"It's hard to get started,  but pretty soon you're  addicted, and you'll be
doing  it the rest of you life,"  Jacobsen said.  Western student Rowenn. 
Kalman has participated in  the Swing Kids club for four  years and dances
the Lindy  Hop.  "I remember seeing the  movie Swing Kids when I  was like
12," Kalman said. "I always had this detached  want to swing dance. So 
when I got to Western and  found out they had a club for  it, I had to, of
course."  Something's  Happening  atthe ROYAL  MONDAY-KARAOKE  -TUESDAY-
KARAOKE  50'^ 9 till 10  T l i 10 till 11  -WEDNESDAY-BIG  RADIO Funk  80s
90s   00 Dance  Ail Pitchers of Beer  $50 f l 5 t i l l l l 
-THURSDAY-CRAZY  COLLEGE NIGHT D J  9 till 10  9 till 11 Silversand Photo
needs an  Appointment Setter  $7.50 to $15.00 per hour  full time or part
time  No experience required!  National Photo Co., Downtown Bellingham 
1-800 990-9080  The men dressed in "zoot  suits," suspenders and baggy, 
pinstripe slacks. The women  wore flared skirts, vintage dresses,  hats and
jewelry. The dancers  buy their elaborate 1940s costumes  at second-hand
stores.  Kalman said she likes to dress  up for the dances.  Dancestore.com
is where most of  them order their special dancing  saddle shoes and their
"zoot  suits," Kalman said.  With a disco ball turning slowly  over his
head, the disc jockey  played records on an old style  vinyl record player
and CDs.  Three couples who knew the  Lindy well made it look effortless, 
spinning, stepping and pivoting  back in time with the music.  The music
included original  tunes by 1940s jazz artists, not  1990s swing bands. 
Those still learning danced on  the outer edges of the floor, moving 
carefully through the complex  steps and pausing between  each move to
balance. The men  dipped their partners and suavely  pulled them back up. 
ft ^  50 Cheeses * Hunter Sausage  Smoked Salmon * Sandwiches  1 ^ ^
www.everybodys.com ^ WESTERN  WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY  Men of Western  Speak
Out  Major: Theater Arts and English     Activities: R.A. - Nash, Dead 
Parrots Society, Campus  Buddies, Concert Choir  "Violence is a part of my 
 world. It hurts me and it hurts  others. We are a world that is 
interwoven, and what  happens to others impacts  me. I can try to help my
fellow  humans by using myself for  the good of our world. Change happens
one second at a  time, let's start now."  Add Your Voice  Contact Brian
Pahl,  Men's Violence Prevention Project Coordinator  Old Main 565
360.650.3290 brian.pahl@wwu.edu  208 L Holly Street /38- 3/01  This ad is
sponsored by Prevention and Wellness Services.  Western Washington
University and Western Men Against  Violence. Supported by Grant No.
1999-WA-VX-0001 awarded  by the Violence Against Women Office. Office of
Justice  Programs and the U.S. Department of Justice. Points of view in
this document are those of the author and do not necessarily  represent the
official position of the U.S. Department of Justice                       




     ----------



     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 14



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  14 • TTte Western Front  SPORTS  NCAA II   Intramural
June 1, 2001 Barron beats Ski to Sea field By Alashia Freimuth  THE WESTERN
FRONT  Barron Heating caught fire  when it became the first team ever to
win three consecutive  championships in the open division  of Bellingham's
28th Ski to  Sea race Sunday.  The Barron Heating team finished  with an
unofficial time of  5:39:44, less than a minute ahead of the second-place
winner,  the Win's Drive-in team.  Last year Barron Heating finished  with
a time of 5:28:13.  Team members from both teams  said they liked having
such a  close race.  Kenny Williams, a biker for.  Barron Heating, said he
had  problems along the way. One of  his high-pressure tires  hit a rock 
which caused his tire to flatten,  16 miles into the leg.  "I thought for
sure (Win's  Drive-In) was going to catch  me," he said.  Still, he managed
to ride the  final 20 miles on a flat tire.  Members of various teams at 
Ski to Sea said the wind was a  problem in both the mountain  and water
competitions. "It was just choppy enough  (Bellingham Bay) to keep it 
interesting, though," said  kayaker Clay Warner, holding  his paddle with
bloody hands.  race results  IBBHIillll  Stephanie Kosonen/ The Western
Front Kayaker Peter Newton waves as biker Kenny Williams approaches for the
handoff.  He took first place in the veterans  division.  Barron Heating
made up for  lost time in the kayaking event.  Kayaker Peter Newton, a
third  time member of the Olympic  Kayaking team, stayed just far  enough
ahead of Win's Drive-in's  Mike Herbert to come in first.  The tide at the
beach of  Marine Park was lower than  usual, adding extra strides for 
Newton as he ran to the finish  line to ring the bell. Barron  Heating
finished 48 seconds  before Win's Drive-In.  "It's disappointing to only
get  second two years in a row," Win's mountain biker Kevin Rowe  said. 
Beavers Tree Service team  won third place in the open division  and first
in the Whatcom  County division with a time of  5:51:13.  "We're just happy
to get third  place overall,"  Beaver's Tree  Service canoeist Brian
Boatman  said.  Barron Heating team members  each received a plaque and 
two for one travel certificates on  Horizon Airlines.  "(Our third
consecutive win) is  pretty exciting because it is pretty  much the same
team," said  Kevin Titus, Barron Heating  downhill skier. "People want to 
stick with what is winning."  SvBeayere;Tre^  Seherrer Photo Masters 
Mixed:  Barron Heating-mixed  Veterans:  . Olson + Ives  Womens:  Boundary
Bay Brewery  High School:  Sportsman Chalet SuperHign  Corporate: 
Bellingham Firefighters 
••:r:;lJnpjrtho lt;to  ^ S t e y e ' s
j ^ l r^  Ski to Sea not just for men, women represent  By Joshua Porter 
THE WESTERN FRONT  The tenuous 24- hour "mad  dash" from Los Angeles to 
Bellingham didn't stop Katrina  Vogel from competing in this  year's  Ski
to Sea race Sunday.  Vpgel, resembling her own  description of teammates as
 "die-hards," started the nearly  1,240-mile drive from her home  in Los
Angeles Friday night,  arriving in Bellingham  Saturday evening.  Such a
long drive doesn't faze  Vogel, who has returned to  Bellingham for the
past six  years to participate in the Ski to  Sea race. The 1991 Western 
graduate is now in a physical  therapy doctoral program at the  University
of Southern  California. Typically a competitor  in the road bike leg of
the race, this year she chose to  mountain bike.  Her team, Pacific Marine 
Exchange, was one of 31 all- women  teams, including  women's competitive
and  women's recreational divisions,  out of 400 teams that  raced  Sunday.
 Overall, Pacific Marine  Exchange placed 187th and  fourth in the women's
division.  She said organization and cooperation  were positive aspects of 
her close-knit team.  "I think we work very well  together," Vogel said.
"We are  very organized."  She credits her team's orderly  habits to team
member Jean  Webster, who raced in the canoeing  event, calling her the
"designated  organizational goddess."  Teammate Nicole Sundene  also
praised Webster, who has  been her canoeing partner in the Ski to Sea race
for the past  seven years. Sundene, also a  Western graduate, now works at 
Virginia Mason Medical Center  in Seattle.  Impressed with a better race 
time this year, Sundene said she  and Webster placed 209th in  their leg. 
"Last year was so bad, I'm surprised  I did it again," Sundene  said. 
Kristin Moore, 1998 Western  graduate, said she, liked performing  on a
womens team better  than a corporate or mixed  team because of the support
her  team gave her. This was her first  year competing with Pacific  Marine
Exchange and her fourth  total racing in the downhill leg.  Placing 126th
in her leg,     Moore said the hike to the top  of chair 1 on the north
face of  the Mount Baker Ski Area was  the most difficult part of the 
race.  "It was tough," Moore said "I  got really tired, but I liked it 
because it was such a  challenge."  Proper training for such a  hike
required climbing flights of  stairs, and for really serious racers,  she
said they should train  carrying their skis.  Western junior Krista Brown 
said racing with an all-women  team was helpful. She placed  266th in the
road bike leg, and  her team, the Burly Girlies, placed 302nd overall and
10th in  the women's division.  With this as her first year  competing in
the Ski to Sea race,  Brown said the racing conditions  were perfect. 
Brown said she didn't anticipate  the 36 miles of terrain on  Mt. Baker
Highway from the  Shuksan Department of  Transportation Station to the
canoe handoff point in Everson.  "There were more hills than I  expected,
but it was a blast,"  Brown said. Other women racers competed  in the 70
mixed teams, including  mixed-competitive, mixed-recreational   divisions,
the 34 corporate  teams or other divisions'.  Western freshman Lee  Zeidner
kayaked for the See SKI, Page 16  Chris Fuller/The Western Front  Brigette
Ranne of the PaddleMasters team approaches  her bike at the beginning of
the  mountain bike section. The team finished third in the mixed division
and 22nd overall.  at the "Baby Blues" on  Bill McDonald Parkway   21 st
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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 15



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  June 1, 2001 Sports The Western Front • 15  Spandex
key. to performance in annual Ski to Sea race By Jennifer L. Jennings  THE
WESTERN FRONT  Reaching the finish line and  ready to celebrate, Western
students  on the Bandito's Mixed  Beans team and Western's  Outdoor Center
team raced against 400 other teams competing  in the Ski to Sea race 
Sunday.  Bandito's Mixed Beans finished  the race in 228th place,  while
the Outdoor Center team  ranked 225th overall in  Bellingham's 85-mile
relay race.  "Our expectation (for the race)  was no tears, to have a lot
of fun  and make it so we would want to  come back next year," said  Brynne
Edwards, who participated  in the downhill skiing leg  of the race for
Bandito's Mixed  Beans. "We obviously weren't  going to get first place,
but the  weather was awesome, and next  year we're shooting for at least 
the top 100."  The team was sponsored by  Bandito's Burritos, and  although
it did not pay the  team's entrance fee, it did provide  the participants
with free T- shirts  and made the team members  a large dinner beforehand. 
Bandito's Mixed Beans participated in five of the seven legs of  the race,
which began atop  Mount Baker at 8:30 a.m. The  team ranked 10th in  the
recreational-  mixed division, finishing  at 5:06:26 p.m.  The action began
when Todd  Pehowski of Bandito's Mixed  Beans began the first stretch of 
the race by cross-country skiing  for about four miles. He ranked  second
in the recreational division  and 60th overall.  "He was an animal and got 
our team off to a great start,"  Edwards said. "He was running  as fast as
he could on his skis."  After Pehowski finished his  section of the race,
Edwards  began his leg and maintained  the team's position and completed 
the 2.5-mile downhill skiing  section in what she said was  "mushy, mushy,
heavy snow." Her, sister, Erin Edwards,  raced in the third leg of Ski to 
Sea, beginning at the Mount  Baker Ski Shop and moving  down Mount Baker
Highway  542 for eight more miles, which  consisted of a 2,000-foot drop in
  elevation.  Running is one of the more  problematic legs of the relay 
because it is straight down hill  and has a good chance of injury,  Edwards
said.  Edwards said one racer collapsed  along side the road and   had to
be driven to the bottom.  Bryan Beatty bicycled the  fourth leg for
approximately 36  more miles to the town of  Everson, where Conor Torpy and
 Lindsey Richards completed the  race by canoeing the last 18  miles.  The
canoe they used was borrowed,  and although his partner  had a good idea of
how to     maneuver the canoe, Torpy said  the team could have shaved time 
Chris Fuller/The Western Front  Kasey  Bell of Grub's Pain Parade reaches
for the rope to ring the bell, signaling the end  of the race. The team
placed 45th overall and 18th in the open division.  off its ending time if
it didn't  have an older canoe made of  "concrete."  Bandito's Mixed Beans
and  the Outdoor Center team celebrated  by visiting some bars in 
Fairhaven and dancing.  "You have to earn the beer, or  shots of tequila as
in the case-of  our team," Edwards said.  The two teams' members also 
discussed ideas of how to  improve in the relay race for 2002.  Torpy said
he believes the  Bandito's Mixed Beans team  tried really hard, and with
each  year, the competition and effort  continue to increase.  Edwards said
the whole team  is still tired, but it hasn't stopped members from scheming
 for next year's relay.  "We're going to start training  earlier, " Edwards
 said.  Many of the members believe  the key to success will be wearing 
'80s neon-colored spandex. "We all. need to wear bright,  neon spandex next
year," joked  Jason Dearborn, who skied for  the Outdoor  Center team. "I
saw  a lot of skiers who were wearing  it; it was nuts. I think it will 
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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 16



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   16 • The Western Front Sports June 1, 2001  Swingers
claim intramural volleyball crown  By Dat Vong THE WESTERN FRONT  The words
side out, 3's, 2's,  over, short and points filled the  air at the
competitive intramural  volleyball championship game  Wednesday in Carver
Gym B.  Team "Swingers," consisting  of Western graduate student  Jamie
O'Green, graduate student  Alison Schlichting, senior Dave Cordell, senior
Bryan  Frost, senior Dan Haverstock,  junior Katie O'Neal and sophomore 
Nicole Guidry, defeated  team Spot and won the tournament  in game three. 
"We got the shirts," Cordell  said.  "Both teams played well.  I'm just
glad we got the T-shirts."  The league started in April  with 11 teams.    
By Wednesday seven teams  remained.  Most of the teams had byes  their
first round.  The tournament started at 7  p.m. At 8 p.m. only four teams, 
Sets on the Beach, Swingers,  Sting Ring and Spot, were left.  Swingers
defeated Sets on the  Beach to secure a seat in the  championship game. 
The Swingers sat patiently  and waited for its next opponent  for the
championship.  "I hope James's team (Spot)  wins," Frost said.  Frost said
James Suh was a  former teammate on Western's  Indoor Volleyball League. 
Frost  and Suh helped lead the  Vikings to a first-place in the  men's
Puget Sound Indoor  Volleyball League. "We spent the whole year  playing
with each other on the  indoor team," Frost said. "It  would be good to go
head to  head."  Spot defeated Sting Ring to  advance to the championship 
game.  Scott Lefeber/ The Western Front  Senior Dan Haverstock prepares to
spike a ball in the intramural volleyball championship game Wednesday
night.  "It was a tough game," Suh  said.  "Sting Ring was a very good  and
athletic team," he said.  The faceoff between the two  volleyball players
began with an  ace served by the Swingers.  On the last point of the first 
game, Suh tried to save his  team.  He failed when he tried to spike the
ball and fell short  landing on the other side of the  net.  The Swingers
won the first  game 25-18.  In a close second game, the  two teams went
into overtime.  The Swingers reached the 25-  point mark first.  Western
student and intramural  volleyball .referee Sean  Matusehak blew the
whistle to  signal the end of the match.  A dispute about the call arose. 
Matusehak said the confusion  was about who touched the ball  last and
whether or not it hit the  net on the last point.  The call was overturned
and  A member  of team  Spot prepares  to  serve the  ball in the 
intramural  volleyball  championship  game  against the  Swingers. 
Matusehak called for a redo on  the last point. Spot took advantage  of the
call and won game  two 31-29.  The Swingers led early in  game three, but
Spot was not far  behindv ; -  Frost said Suh was the go-to  guy; they
needed to focus on him  in the third game.  The Spot team came back from
losing 3-8 to 12-14.  The Swingers held on and won  the tournament, with a
15-12  win in game three .   "It felt good to beat James's  team," O'Neal
said.  Suh said his whole team tried  its best.  "They just got to the
points  first," Suh said, referring to the  Swingers.  Frost said the Spot
was the  best team to play at  the end. He  said it brought the best out of
 his team.  "This was a fun team to play  with," Frost said. "Next year 
we're gunning for another T-shirt." 
••HHHH  iiiiiiriw  Scott Lefeber/  The
Western  Front Women show their stuff in 85-mile Ski to Sea race  From SKI,
Page 14  Bellingham Tennis Club team  for the second year participating  in
the race. A kayak guide for  San Juan Safaris, she said she  was
enthusiastic about the large  crowd. She said she plans on  racing in the
downhill skiing leg  next year but doesn't like the  hike.  A member of a
mixed team,  kayaker Alison Brooks of  Seattle,said she likes a co- ed 
team setting. Her team, the  Scutmonkeys, placed 130th  overall. All
members of the  team work in the Pediatric division  of Childrens' Hospital
in  Seattle.  With a moderate headwind off  Bellingham Bay, Brooks said her
 leg of the race was difficult, but  she plans to return next year, 
possibly in the road bike leg.  With the difficulty of all parts  of the
Ski to Sea race behind  them, all of these women racers  agreed the
excitement of the  race would draw them back next  year. Sundene even said
that  physical disability would be the  only obstacle stopping her from 
competing.  "I'll do it again next year  unless I have two broken arms," 
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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 17



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  June 1, 2001  OPINIONS  Letters   Editorials The Western Front
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j^ljI^ljjfiilHili^ii  lllffff^^  thre  or at \h  Spring Allergies  Getting 
You Down?  mos  drink  whei WE CAN 2000  If you are one of the estimated 35
million  Americans suffering from allergies, and presently experiencing 
symptoms of sneezing, nasal congestion,  itchy nose, runny nose, and sleep
disturbances related  to your allergies, you may be eligible to participate
in a  research study to evaluate an investigational medication  for the
treatment of seasonal allergic rhinits.  Eligible participants will receive
study medication    evaluations at no cost, and.will be compensated  for
time and efforts.  For more information about this and  other studies with
Dr. David Elkayam, please call  Bellingham Asthma, Allergy   Immunology 
Clinical Research Center at  (360)733-5733  or email  rlsapp@hinet.org or
kravilla@hinet.org  MiviiWtW             



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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 18



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  18 • The Western Front Opinions June 1, 2001  Frontline
 Hate mongers have rights, too  On his historic  midnight ride, American
patriot Paul Revere  warned the colonial townspeople: "The British are
coming! The  British are coming!"  Attention Bellingham: The bigots are
coming! The bigots are  coming!  When 18- year-old Krystal Bennett, a
Ferndale High School student  and open lesbian, was crowned prom king last
month at her  junior-senior prom, it got most of Whatcom County's
attention.  The news also garnered national attention, including that of 
vehemently anti-gay preacher the Rev. Fred Phelps, who is on his  way  to
Bellingham from Kansas, of all places, to protest Ferndale  High's June 9
graduation ceremony at Civic Stadium.  Phelps is known for organizing
allegedly more than 20,000 anti-homosexuality  protests, including one at
the funeral of homosexual  martyr Matthew Shepard, whom Phelps states on
his Web site  "has  been burning in hell for 963 days. Deal with it." 
Phelps' message may be unpopular and even unwanted, but he  has every right
under the First Amendment to assemble a group of  hate mongers, hold up his
usual signs — "God Hates Fags," "AIDS  Cures Fags" and
"Fags Doom Nations," for example — and protest  until he
sweats holy water. It is a legal and celebrated exercise of  free speech
and expression.  If we can applaud the efforts of Ferndale High students to
express  their open-mindedness by voting a lesbian prom king, as well as
her  willingness to assume that role, we should be able to appreciate 
anyone else's efforts to disagree with that and tell the world- why. 
Nobody should have their voice silenced, regardless of their opinion.  Less
conservative people can't fault Phelps for believing what he  does. But
they can disagree and be just as vocal about it.  Several local opponents
of Phelps and his followers are taking  the right approach by turning
something harmful into something  helpful.. They are organizing a pledge
drive for two scholarship  funds: one for a local gay or lesbian student
and one for a student  who promotes diversity in school. Individuals and
organizations  will pledge money for every minute Phelps pickets outside
the  graduation ceremony.  The groups will also host an Every Minute Counts
countdown for  people who want to assemble in opposition to Phelps
somewhere  away from the ceremony.  Like Phelps, the counter-protesters are
exercising their freedom  to peaceably assemble for a cause in a creative
and constructive  way.  So who's right? It doesn't matter. All parties are
taking the right   approach.  Students and community members have a common,
yet rarely  practiced opportunity to give a  damn and support a cause.
Those  who support the fundraiser can e-mail nwproud@yahoo.com to cosponsor
or pledge. People can also find contact information for  Phelps and his
followers at http://www.godhatesfags.com — if so 
inclined.  And for the record, this editorial board thinks Phelps'
preaching  is savage, deluded and archaic, and the board has a right to say
so  Hell hath no fury like the freedom of the press.  Frontlines are the
opinion of The Western Front editorial board:  Heather Baker, Kristin
Bigsby, J.R. Cook, Ben Dalpos, Jennifer Collins,  Chris Fuller, Josh Haupt,
Jessica Keller, Remy Kissel and Travis Phelps.  The Western Front 
Editor-in-Chief: Kristin Bigsby; Managing Editor: Remy Kissel; Copy
Editors: Jessica Keller, Aaron Crabtree, Hollie  Joy Brown; Photo Editors:
Chris Fuller, Stephanie Kosonen;  News Editors: Heather Baker, Travis
Phelps; Accent and  Features Editor: Jennifer Collins; Sports Editor: Ben
Dalpos;  Opinions Editor: Josh Haupt; Online Editor: J.R. Cook; 
Cartoonist: Jennifer Jennings; Adviser: Jim NapoLi; Business  Manager:
Alethea Macomber; Advertising Manager: Joel  Hall.  Staff Reporters: Kelli
Alderson, Tessa Allison, Carly Barrett,  Eric Berto, Tara Blakeman, Carrie
Borgaard, Allison Butler,  Paul Nicholas Carlson, Emily Christianson, Keri
Cooper,  Alicia Franklin, Alashia  Freimuth, Robert Gara, Brooke  Geery,
Tamara Harvey, Ken Jager, Jennifer Jennings, Leanne Josephson, Kristihe
Kemp, Stephanie Kitchens, Scott Lefeber,  Casey Littlejohn, Brendan
Manning, Candace Nelson, Jennifer  O'Brien, Camille Penix, Joshua Porter,
Bernadette Ramel,  Nazkhatoon Riahi, Sonja Rose, Christina Schrum, Jessica 
Sparks, Joseph Terrell, Quoc Tran, Jennifer True, Dat Vong.  And we quote: 
'There is only one person to  blame for all this, and that's  Jim
Jeffords/'  Senator (and former Senate majority leader) Trent Lott  about
Senator Jim Jeffords' decision to leave the  Republican Party. Social
security needs reform  Ben  Dalpos  COMMENTARY  In 1935, the government 
promised full benefits for retired  people. What a crock that is  turning
out to be for younger  generations.  This generation will pay more  and
receive less, yet today's  retired folk sitting in Arizona  are reaping the
benefits when  their contribution to Social  Security was minimal compared 
with the benefits received. 'President George W. Bush  is doing something
right  with his appointment of a  commission for Social Security reform.
It's not  much, but at least it's a  start.'  They expect the benefits and 
deserve some financial backing  from the government, but when  this
generation will pay 10 times  as much and see less,  it's not  right. 
Privatization and reform are  the only answers to solve the  problem of
Social Security. This   and future generations are up a  creek when they
retire.  Yes, some people might waste  their money on bad investments 
— that is where the government  should step in and
advise the  people as to where they  can  invest their money.  President
George W. Bush is  doing something right with his  appointment of a
commission for  Social Security reform. It's not  much, but at least it's a
start.  Everyone should know that  Social Security is not going to be  able
to pay full benefits when  this generation retires. It needs  to be changed
now, or no one will  see what they deserve. By the  year 2038, if no
reforms are  made, Social Security will not be  allowed to make the full
payments  to its retirees.  By that time, today's college student still
would have to wait  about 10 years until they could  retire with so-called
full benefits.  In 1940 Social Security had 42  workers support each
beneficiary  and contributed 2 percent of  their first $3,000  earned.
Today,  3.4 workers support each beneficiary,  and they pay 12.4 percent 
of their first $80,400 earned. It  is preposterous that this generation 
will pay up to 19 percent to  maintain full benefits.  The main reason no
reform  has been implemented is that it  is political suicide for any
candidate  to even mention cutting  back Social Security. One of the  main
forces behind that is the  American Association of  Retired  People (AARP).
 'It is preposterous that this  generation will pay up to  19 percent to
maintain full  benefits.'  AARP is the second biggest  lobbyist in
Washington, D.C.,  behind only the tobacco companies.  The retired people
have a  distinct advantage, mainly  because they all vote. The only  way to
• trump AARP's dominance  is for the younger voting 
generations to vote.  AARP leads the way in preventing  Social Security
reform.  Its objective is to secure more  money for retired people now, 
while their grandkids end up  with nothing. This will continue  until the
younger generations  can get their acts together and  adopt a political
candidate and  party for Social Security reform.  The younger generations  
  need  to move now in the fight to get  their money back, so they too  can
buy a Winnebago.  Concerts not place for small children  Brian  Harrington 
COMMENTARY  Parents with young children  often expose their children to 
environments that are dangerous  for the child.  Sometimes people forget
that  children are still developing  many of the functions that  adults
take for granted, such as  vision, hearing and breathing.  A perfect
example of this can  be seen during almost any concert  at the Gorge: Among
good  friends, and a great band, dancing,  small children are perched  in
their parents backpacks crying  from the pain in their ears.  Young
children have no business  being at a rock concert. Not because their
crying interrupts  the show, but because they are  crying from pain.  The
problem is not the concerts  or the loud music — it's 
parents who make the irresponsible  decision to take their child to a
concert.  It may sound like a good idea,  but it's really just stupid and 
cruel to the child. These parents  should realise what they are  See KIDS,
Page 19  eiisoduio;                                             



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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 19



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  June 1,2001 Opinions The Western Front • 19  Parental
irresponsibility shouldn't leave small children crying  from loud rock
concerts, smoked filled lungs, illegal drug use  From KIDS, Page 18  doing
to their child.  In one recent example of  parental irresponsibility at the
 Gorge, both parents of a young  child had been drinking.  'The problem is
not the  concerts or the loud music  — it's parents who
make  the irresponsible decisions  to take their child to a  concert.'  The
parents in question at a  recent Tom Petty concert were  both intoxicated.
The parent carrying  the child in a backpack fell  and nearly dropped the
child.  Another recent example, awkward  to witness, was parents  who had
brought their child  along to a house party.  They stood in a garage, the 
designated smoking area, and  forced their child, again in a backpack, to
endure the blaring  music and smoke-filled room.  These are both examples
of  environments  that children  should not be forced into by  delinquent
parents who are  more interested in their own  fun than the welfare of
their  children.  Furthermore, to see a parent  smoke a pipe full of weed,
still  with the child in a backpack, is  abhorrent.  It's a parent's choice
to smoke  pot, fair enough, but to involve  very small children is just
plain  reckless.  Having a child brings a great  deal of responsibility. 
What may sound like a fun  evening for parents might be  harmful for a
child.  Small children don't have the  ability to say to their parent, 
Excuse me, oh irresponsible  father/mother of mine, but  could we perhaps
not damage  my tender ears and tiny lungs  this evening?  'The parents in
question at  a recent Tom Petty concert  were both obviously intoxicated. 
The parent carrying  the child in a backpack fell  and nearly dropped the 
child.'  Bottom line, if you are a parent  and choose to go to a concert 
or a wild party, get yourself a  baby sitter.  From JUMP, Page 10  spirit
in which People for Public  hearty right on to all those who  Please sign
the petition going  liMBHMB^BlllliiilPilii  were quotes from Poi  learned
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WESTERN FRONT CLASSIFIEDS 
•••••^iiHIiBlllBllll
     iMWi:48 M   '91 FORD ESCORT LX, AT, PS, PB,  Runs great. 671-8468
$2,200.  EDUCATION MAJORS- hands-on  math lesson plans available at Village
 Books, grades 1-6, NCTM approved-fully tested. 671-2626. Author, Peter 
Gray.  LAKE SAMSH waterfront duplex 3boV  2ba gas heat   all applian. 
incd. avail  sept 1 12mo lease $1090/mo + dep  224-3149  CLOSE TO campus
room available for summer. 914 Indian, call Matt for more  info 715-8400. 
GREAT HOUSE for lease. 4BD/2BA,  5min. to campus, w/d, wood floors,
skylights,  2-car garage, 5yrs old, quiet  neighborhood, np, avail. June
15th $1300mo. 733-6046.  GARDEN WEDDING venue in sunny  Sequim. Rent our
farmhouse with ifs  5 acres of unobstructed view of the  Olympic Mts.
(360)681-3099.  www.cuttinggarden.com.  GREAT 4BD/2BAtown-houses. Close  to
WWU, w/d, d/w, 2 car garage, $1200/  mo. 734-2514.  3   4BD12 bth- adjacent
to WWU- remodeled,  wshr/dryr, dw. $945/m Fall,  $600/m Summer. 319-1288
(directions-from  corner of 22nd   Douglas go N on  22nd to the end of the
street- Taylor  Heights Apt.). Open house Sat. 1-4pm.  NEW 2 bedroom units!
Reserve now  for Sept. 1st. Just 2 blocks to campus  and on shuttle route. 
Sunny decks on  all units and onsite parking. Gas fireplace,  dishwasher
and w/d in unit.  Cable and phone jacks in bedrooms.  $650/mo includes
W/S/G. For a tour or  more info call 303-0149  DUPLEX FOR  rent. 3bd 2ba
gas heat    all appliances included. Walk to  WWU. Available July 1, 12mo
lease  $950/mo  + deposit. Call 671-9837.  4BD 1.5 bath house for rent. Gas
heat    all appliances included. Walk to WWU. Available July 1, 12mo lease 
$1250/mo + deposit. Call 671-9837.  RESERVE NOW at Rowan Grove Con-dos  for
Sept. Townhomesw/fireplaces,  gas hw, Baker view, skylights, DBLgarage, 
free cable, walk WWU, call  671-2899.  $325 Unf. Rental to share. 2BI, WWU.
 Pri; Rm; Ba; Frid; o/s pkg; n/s/p  647-826.0.  4 BEDROOM houses, all close
to campus.  12mo. Leases start 7/1-9/1. viewgreenproperties.com.  "ANDREA
RIDGE" Reserve now for  Sept. 1st! Newer 1   4 bdrm units.  Onsite laundry 
 parking. Sunny decks  with views from upper units- $450-  $1,100/mo W/S/G
included.  Call (360) 303-0149.  "NEW ENGLAND" Reserve now for  Sept. 1st!
Brand new 1 bdrm units available.  Gas fireplace, vaulted ceilings    W/D
in unit. 2blocksto campus   onsite  parking. $575/mo includes W/S/G. Call
(360) 303-0149.  4 BD/2BA Homes available Summer    Fall. $1,100-$1,200/mo.
738-4834.  : .*,.....w»...... "iv" gt;'~"v^^^^^^^^^^^^g  SINGER
FOR alternative band. We  have a rough demo on CD. Call Brandon  or Nick
733-53 03  GRADUATION TICKETS 2:00 PM. Will  pay money. Please call Pam
756-8572.  NEED ONE graduation ticket desperately!  Call Kristin 650-3162
or  756-6094..  WANTED- 4 graduation tickets for af-.  temoon ceremony.
Will pay! Please cal  303-4642.  SUMMER CAMP staff: waterfront,  horseback
riding and counselors at  Camp Killoqua near Everett, Wa 6/13-  8/12.
452-258-5437  or  www.snohomishcampfire.org/  campjobs.  SUMMER JOB
opportunity! Seeking 30  people to fill caviar   salmon processing 
positions at cold storage in Kake,  Alaska Great opportunity to make quick 
cash for school. Company will provide  food, housing,   travel to Kake.
Contact  Mike at (907) 785-3110 or e- mail  ikuraman@hotmail.com  LOOKING
FOR hard working reliable  people for appointment setting position. 
Average $10 per hour. Call after 2PM  M-F. 527-9499  NOW HIRING STUDENTS
100's of positions available throughout WA.  Work close to home, work
outside, work  w/friends. Unlimited hours, interview  today, start
tomorrow. No experience  necessary. Call College Pro Painters  @
1-888-277-9787 PACKAGING   SHIPPING- let Sunset  Postal and Business Center
get your  belongings home safely, (computers,  clothing, sports equip.,
stereo, etc.).  Free pick-up for Western students and  faculty. Free
estimates. Call 738-9210  ROOMMATES NEEDED for 4BD 2BA  apt. Available 7/1
-8/31 Really nice!  756- 0002.  ROOMATE NEEDED- private B d - (in 
4brJ/2bth unit), adjacent to WWU, NP,  NS, $250/m, 319- 1288
(directions-from  corner of 22nd   Douglas go N on 22nd  to end of street-
Taylor Heights Apt).  Open  house Sat. 1 -4pm  2 BD CONDO, $287.50/mo +
deposit,  n/s/p, W/S/G paid, w/d, d/w, close to  WWU, 715-0393. 
DIRECTOR-Ferndale image group is  looking for a director of the play for
the  annual Mystery in  the Park at Ferndale.  This event takes place at
the end of  September. If you are interested please contact Arlene
Houlgate, coordinator.  (360) 384-5265. Please respond by  June 15th.
Auditions will be held the  first week of August.  VOLUNTEER: AFRICA? A
life changing  experience that can make a difference.  Teach rural families
how to prevent  diseases, Train future teachers in  Africa, Build latrines
with families, Combat  AIDS!! with knowledge   actions,  Bean English
teacher/sports instructor   @ a school for youngsters. 14   11 mo. 
Development Instructor Prog. Start 9/01  or 10/01. Program fee.  Grants
avail,  contact www.cctg.org or'(503) 467-4082.  GO DIVING in Thailand! WWU
student  guiding 1 mo. trips. Avoid rainy northwest  winter Jan   Feb.
2002. Airfare,  travel, accommodations   diving incl. $1950. For info 
www.divethai@hotmail.com  TEACHERS, STUDENTS, School employees-  discounted
auto insurance  rates, reasonable affordable, call new  office in town
(360) 527-1344, Arthur  Insurance Agency Mary Berg-Agent.  STORAGE FOR
Summer, (4ft X 6ft-  $25/mo), (18ft X 22ft- $75/mo) @(NWC  of  22nd  
Taylor) 319-1288  MARKETING INTERNSHIP- Nantucket  Nectars is looking for
enthusiastic and dedicated individuals interested in the  field of
marketing, promotions and public  relations in Seattle. Gain hands on 
experience, earn college credit and have  fun this summer. Please submit
resume    cover  letter immediately to: Nantucket  Nectars Interns, Email: 
arandolph@juiceguys.com.  Fax (206) 789- 0110.                             
                 



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     Western Front 2001-06-01 - Page 20



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  20 • The Western Front June 1, 2001  BUYBACK  The
College Store  Sehome Village Mall  320 36th St.  Bellingham, WA 98225  Yon
have a choice...use it.  'rTW'T/rrmirttWmimwn^  I IPXO CQPflOl   PPPPP