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     Western Front 2005-06-28 - Page 1



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  HE WESTERN FRONT  AY, JUNE 2.8, 2005 • WESTERN
WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY • BELLINGHAM, WASH.
vWESTERNFRONTONLINE.COM  ISSUE Z  VOLUME 13 «f  Western expands
to waterfront land  BY KELSEY DOSEN  The Western Front  The Port of
Bellingham is collaborating with the Belling-ham  City Council to clean up
the city's waterfront, and has  offered Western a space for possible
expansion. Western is  deciding how to use the land.  Currently,
Georgia-Pacific, a pulp and paper mill that  ceased operation in 2001,
occupies the area, said Robert Fra-zier,  Western vice president  for
external affairs.  The 150-acre property starts at the Port of Bellingham
on  Bellingham Bay and wraps around the harbor. Frazier said  Western would
use only a portion of the area, but the port and  the City Council have yet
to determine the amount.  "This is the port's and the city's project," he
said. "They  just invited us to participate."  The port and the City
Council will tear down and recycle  or remodel the warehouses, port
property and 16 brick buildings  located on the land before Western
develops the area,   said Buff Schoenfeld, executive assistant to the
president of  the university.  Last spring, Western President Karen Morse
appointed a  committee composed of 15 faculty members from various
departments  to review proposals for the utilization of the area, 
Schoenfeld said. During the past year, Western received 22  proposals from
faculty, students and departments.  The proposals range from the university
building a possible  park and ride facility to it moving entire academic
departments,  such as  the department of art, to the waterfront,  Frazier
said.  Plans are still in the early phases of development and the 
committee has not decided what to do with the property, she  said.  Linda
Beckman, budget director for student affairs, said she  submitted a
proposal April 15 for Western to build an arena for  events  that would
benefit Western, as well as the community.  Western could use the space for
campus activities such  as commencement, and community members could use it
 for activities such as concerts. The campus does not have  the space
necessary for events with a substantial amount of  people, Beckman said. 
"The beauty of the plan is it also provides a facility of value  to the
community," she said. "The area also bridges the marina  to Fairhaven, so
it might get people out and about more."  The Port of.Bellingham invited
Morse's suggestions in the  Exploding with patriotism  see WATERFRONT, page
8 ^0M"-  SUSAN ROSENBERRY/The Western Front  Lummi Nation residents David
Jefferson, 4 1 , and Evelyn Jefferson, 36, discuss fireworks prices for
July 4  at the Hillaires fireworks stand at the intersection of Slater Road
and Ferndale Road.  Fire officials offer rules, tips for fireworks use  as
residents prepare to celebrate the holiday  BY SUSAN ROSENBERRY  The
Western Front  The bright and colorful celebration of Independence  Day can
create legal issues for fireworks users if they do  not abide by Whatcom
County  and Bellingham laws. Risks  arise if people do not use fireworks
safely, said Brian Flan-nelly,  public information officer for the
Bellingham Fire  Department and Whatcom Medic One.  Individuals planning to
use personal fireworks must  abide by city and county rules regarding
fireworks use to  prevent legal repercussions, such as imprisonment for as 
many as 90 days and fines up to $1,000, Bellingham Police  Sgt. Tim Lintz
said.  Shoppers must purchase legal fireworks — city and
 county laws dictate the legality of certain fireworks —
 from licensed stands, Flannelly said.  People can light fireworks at
varying times within Bellingham  city limits and in Whatcom County.
Bellingham  residents can fight fireworks between 9 a.m. and midnight  only
on July 4, while people in the rest of Whatcom County  can light fireworks
from June 28 to July 5, he said.  Bellingham tightened its fireworks
restrictions as a preventative measure in response to Washington's 2003 
drought, and has continued the restrictions since then,  Flannelly said. 
"People can get burned, poked and blown-up with fireworks  if they are not
used properly," Lintz said.  People or families that choose not to use
personal fireworks  can still enjoy the spectacle at the public fireworks 
show, Flannelly said. The Bellingham/Whatcom Chamber  see FIREWORKS, page 8
 Wrights donate seven outdoor sculptures  Courtesy of Special Collections
Wilson Library  Mark di Suvero stands in front of his sculpture "For
Handel".in  1975 on campus with donors Bagley and Virginia Wright. The 
Wrights have promised to donate seven more sculptures to  Western's
collection, including another piece by di Suvero.  BY CANDACE CUSANO  The
Western Front  Seattle art patrons Virginia and Bagley Wright have 
promised a gift of seven sculptures to add to Western's current collection
of 25 outdoor sculptures. The  Western Foundation accepted the gift June
10.  The Wrights have donated and helped fund seven  of the 25 sculptures
that currently decorate Western's campus, said Sarah Clark-Langager,
curator of  Western's outdoor sculpture collection.  Their first gift to
the university, titled "For Handel,"  is the sculpture by artist Mark di
Suvero that  sits in the Virginia Wright Plaza outside of the Performing 
Arts Center, Clark-Langager said.  "The fund began in the early 1970s,"
Virginia  Wright said. "We wanted to find a place in western  Washington to
help build and promote a collection.".  The beauty of the campus, and the
existing sculpture  at Western by artist Isamu Noguchi, influenced  the
Wrights' decision to donate sculptures to the university,  she said.  "The
Wrights have been involved with the outdoor  sculpture at Western for
decades as lifelong philanthropists   eager to see the collection grow and
flourish,"  said Stephanie Bowers, vice president of university advancement
and executive director of the Western  Foundation. "Their generous gift of
seven of their personal  pieces caps Western's already highly-regarded 
collection. I am very pleased that this incredible gift  will have an
everlasting effect on Western."  see SCULPTURES, page 8  SUMMER SOUNDS
WSSBBHBBM  The Viking Union showcases  musicians in a concert series 
ACCENT, PAGE 4   FINISH LINE  Eight thousand bicyclists  enjoy summer at
annual race  SPORTS, PAGE 5                                     



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     Western Front 2005-06-28 - Page 2



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  2 • THE WESTERN FRONT NEWS JUNE 28,2005  COPS BOX 
University Police  June 23, 2:41 a.m.: UP responded  to a report of a man
hit by a dart in  the Ridgeway Complex.  June 23, 12:55 a.m.: UP assisted 
the Beilingham Police Department  in an attempt to locate a Peeping  Tom on
south campus. June 23,12:14 a.m.: UP responded  to a suicide attempt and
officers  took the woman to the station. Officers transported her to the 
hospital where doctors determined  she had overdosed.  Beilingham Police 
June 26, 12:57 p.m.: Officers  arrested Robin Miller, 42, on. the  2900
block of Meridian Street on suspicion of urinating in a public  place. v 
June 25, 11:21 p.m.: Officers  responded to a report of a missing  person
on the 100 block of Sea  Pines Lane. The person was later  found with a
friend.  June 25,2  p.m.: Officers responded  to a report of someone
driving away  without paying for gas on the 3900  block of Meridian Street.
 June 25, 12:40 a.m.: Officers  responded to a loud party on the  600 block
of East Myrtle Street  and cited a 21-year-old man for  disorderly conduct.
 June 24, 9:32 p.m.: Officers responded to a fight in a transient  camp on
the 4100 block of Gordata  Park. A man hit another man in the   head.  June
24, 3:30 p.m.: Officers  responded to a vehicle that struck a  deer that
was darting onto the 500  block of East Ivy Street.  Compiled by Katie
Rothenberger  V TOl  iking  oices  Justin Hjelm  Junior, finance  Have you
ever injured yourself  with fireworks or known anyone  who has?  Nathan
Franck  Junior, biology and Spanish  Randal Gabel  Senior, psychology and 
philosophy  My friend lit an  M-80 in his hand.  It had a short fuse  and
now he only has  threefingers.  • ) • )
 Compiled by Susan Rosenbeny  Last summer, my  roommate tried  shooting a
firework  out of his ass. He  has a scar now — it  didn
't really work.  55 / used to blow up  mailboxes, but I'm  a firm believer
in  safety first, so I  never got hurt. *)* gt;  AP Wire news briefs  STATE
NEWS  Microsoft and Toshiba  form alliance  Officials at Microsoft Corp. 
and Japanese electronics-maker  Toshiba announced plans June 27  to work
together to develop high-definition  DVD players.  Microsoft Chairman Bill
Gates  and Toshiba President Atsutoshi  Nishida will  disclose details of 
the new agreement Monday at a  Tokyo hotel.  NATIONAL NEWS  Officer shoots
at child driver  A Polk County Sheriff's deputy  fired at least three shots
at a 12-  year-old girl who attempted to  run him over with a car June 27, 
Florida authorities said.  Officials said the girl was  driving a Chevrolet
Cavalier with  Corrections  In the June 23 article ''Jumpih  Cox was
referred^fsis^^^^^^^^M^0^^^ff^  The Western F I X ^ K ^  The Western Front
is published twice weekly in fall, winter and spring;  once a week in
summer session. Address: The Western Front, Western Washington  University,
CF 251, Beilingham,  WA 98225. The Western Front is  the official newspaper
of Western Washington University, published by the  Student Publications
Council, and is mainly supported by advertising.  Opinions and stories in
the newspaper have no connection with advertising.  News content is
determined by student editors. Staff reporters are enrolled  in a course in
the Department of Journalism, but any student enrolled  at Western  may
offer stories to the editors.  Advertising inquiries should be directed to
the business office in CF 230,  or by phone to (360) 650-3161.  Members of
the Western community are entitled to a single free copy of each issue of
The Western Front.  her 6-year-old brother inside. Two  deputies blocked
the Cavalier between their cars after the girl  began to drive toward
Deputy  Chris Hillsgrove, who was  standing next to his vehicle.  A
sheriff's office spokeswoman  said Hillsgrove feared for his life  and
fired at the Cavalier before  jumping out of the way.  The deputy is on
administrative  leave, and the girl faces several  charges, including
attempted  murder and aggravated battery.  Nurse admits he killed  ;,...,
terminally inpatients,  A former nurse admitted to  killing five more
people by giving  them overdoses of medication.  Charles Cullen has now
confessed  to killing 29 people in New Jersey  and Pennsylvania since 1987,
most  by injecting the patients with high  doses of heart drugs.  He
pleaded guilty for the latest  five . murders June 27 in New   Jersey
Superior Court.  Cullen's lawyer said Cullen  believed his victims were 
terminally ill and that it was   dehumanizing to prolong people's  lives by
artificial means.  INTERNATIONAL NEWS  Pope rushes saint-making process 
The Rev. Giuseppe D'Alonzo,  the "devil's advocate" in Pope  John Paul's
beatification process,  is pledging to remain objective, but  also said he
supports the cause.  D'Alonzo is the promoter of  justice in the Diocese of
Rome,  and investigates any possible  doubts about Pope John Paul's 
saintliness.  The process includes reviewing  the pope's work, interviewing
 witnesses about possible miracles  and gathering letters, articles,  books
and other documents  written about him.  Pope Benedict heeded calls  from
the public and waived the  traditional five-year waiting  period for
sainthood, allowing  John Paul's saint-making process  to begin June 28. 
Italian men to show  more skin  If Italian designers" have their  way, men
will be showing more  of their skin and physique next  summer.  This week
is Men's Fashion  Week in Milan, and designers are  previewing next
summer's styles.  The designers' new trend is tight-fitting  on top and
baggy below.  Designer models so far have  displayed unbuttoned shirts 
that reveal bare chests, below  the waistline ultra-short shorts, 
transparent T-shirts and shiny  evening wear.  Compiled by Susan Rosenbeny 
AP Wire courtesy KUGS 89.3-FM  WWU Official Announcements  Deadline for
announcements in this space is noon Thursday for inclusion in the next
Tuesday  issue. Announcements should be limited to 50 words. Announcements
may be submitted  by e- mail to FAST@wwu.edu. The subject line should
contain a one- or two-word topic  title and clearly state that the item is
for Official Announcements. Items sent by e-mail  should be sent separately
from submissions to FAST. Announcements that are typewritten  or legibly
printed also may be sent through campus mail to "Official Announcements," 
MS -9117, sent via fax to X/4343, or brought in person to Commissary 113A. 
DO NOT SEND ANNOUNCEMENTS DIRECTLY TO THE WESTERN FRONT OFFICES. Phoned 
announcements will not be accepted. All announcements should be signed by  
  originator.  PLEASE POST  TESTING SCHEDULES ARE AVAILABLE ON THE WEB at
www.ac.wwu.edu/-assess/tc.htm.  THE MATH PLACEMENT TEST (MPT) is offered at
3 p.m. on July 11,18, 25, Aug. 1, 8, 15, and at 9 a.m. Thursdays  on June
30, July 7,14, 21, 28, and Aug. 18. Registration is not required. Students
must bring photo identification, their  student number, Social Security
number, and a No. 2 pencil. A $15 fee is payable in the exact amount at
time of testing.  Allow 90  minutes.  THE TRANSFER TRANSITIONS MATH
PLACEMENT TEST will be given at 3 p.m. July 8,13, and 15. Registration is
not  required. Students must bring photo identification, their student
number, Social  Security number, and a No. 2 pencil. A  fee of $15 is
payable in the exact amount at time of testing. Allow  90 minutes.  THE
MATH PLACEMENT TEST SCHEDULE AND SAMPLE TOPICS may be found on the Web at
www.ac.wwu.edu/  -assess/tc.htm.  MILLER ANALOGIES TEST (MAT). The Miller
Analogies Test is administered as a computer-based test, by appointment 
only. Appointments may be made in person in Old Main 120 or by calling
X/3080. A fee of $42 is payable at test time.  Fall quarter the fee
increases to $60. The test takes about VA hours. Preliminary scores will be
available immediately;  official results will be mailed within 15 days. 
WEST-B TEST. Anyone applying for admission to state-approved teacher
education programs must meet the minimum  passing score on the basic skills
assessment by the application deadline. Visitwww.west.nesinc.com for
registration information  and a study guide with sample test questions. The
remaining WEST-B test dates for the 2004-05 academic year  is July 9. Note
that registration deadlines are several weeks in advance.  WEST-E PRAXIS.
Washington state requires individuals seeking teacher certification and
teachers seeking additional  endorsements to pass a subject knowledge
assessment in the chosen endorsement area (the Washington Educator Skills 
Test — Endorsement, or WEST-E), beginning Sept. 1. The
state has chosen specific Praxis II series tests to meet this requirement, 
now referred to as the WEST-E Praxis. See www.ets.org/praxis/prxwa.html for
a  description and online registration  information. Registration bulletins
also are available in MH 216. INFORMATION REGARDING NATIONAL TESTING is
available at the Testing Center, OM 120. DEADLINE FOR ANNOUNCEMENTS IN THIS
SPACE IS NOON THURSDAY for inclusion in the next Tuesday issue. 
Announcements should be kept to 50 words or less and may be submitted by
e-mail to FAST@wwu.edu with a one-or  two-word topic in the subject line
and clearly stating it is for Official Announcements. Typed or legibly
printed  announcements also may be sent by fax to X/4343, sent to "Official
Announcements" at MS -9117, or brought to  CM111.  DO NOT SEND OFFICIAL
ANNOUNCEMENTS DIRECTLY TO WESTERN FRONT OFFICES. Phoned announcements will 
not be accepted. All announcements should be signed by originator.         
                                       



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     Western Front 2005-06-28 - Page 3



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  FEATURES/ACCENT  TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2005 •
WESTERNFRONTONLINE.COM • PAGE 3 IMPROV
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 All Shows at 8:00 pm  $10 General •  $8 Students with ID
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Best of Volumes 4 -6  Saturday, July 2  The Upfront Players  Saturday, July
9  Seattle's Jet City  Box office opens at 7:00 pm  Advance Ticket Sales:
Wed. - Fri., Noon till 3pm  Call or visit the Box Office the week of
performance  REGISTER NOW FOR IMPROV CLASSES  Summer Session
• Taught by Sheila Goldsmith  Buy One Ticket Get Second
One Half Price With This Ad!  Already-dead woman involved in  car accident 
Local authorities found a young woman dead in a car that was  involved in
an auto accident near  Tokyo Sunday morning. She was  dead for at least one
full day before  the accident occurred, local police  said in a June 26
Reuters article. Emergency personnel discovered  the body of Rie Ishikawa,
28, in a  state of rigor mortis, in the backseat  of her family's vehicle,
according  to the Kyodo news agency.  The woman's husband, Masayuki
Ishikawa, 32, was driving when the  car hit a concrete wall and then a 
highway-lane divider. Masayuki  left the car to find his 3-year-old  son,
who was thrown from the  passenger seat of the car, according  to the news
agency. He and the boy  were then both struck and killed by  an oncoming
vehicle.  Police said the cause of the  woman's death remains unknown. 
Locksmith creates duplicate key  from X-ray  A man from North Platte, Neb.,
 accidentally swallowed his friend's  truck keys after placing the keys in 
his mouth as a prank on his friend,  according to a June 24 Associated 
Press article.  Doctors told prankster Arthur Richardson the keys posed no
risk  to his health. Richardson's friend,  who needed to access the keys,
took  Richardson's stomach X-rays to a  locksmith, who created a new key. 
The locksmith said he had never  made a key from an X-ray before,  but the
key worked fine.  Farmer kills leopard with his  bare hands  A Kenyan
peasant farmer, near  the capital of Nairobi, severely  wounded an
attacking leopard when he reached into the animal's  mouth and tore out its
tongue, local  authorities said, according to a June  22 Reuters article. 
Daniel M'Mburugu, 73, was  working in his field when the leopard  charged
at him  from the surrounding  long grass. M'Mburugu pulled out  the
leopard's tongue, leaving the  animal writhing on the ground.  "A voice,
which must have come  from God, whispered to me to drop  the panga
(machete)  and thrust  my hand in its wide-open mouth,"  M'Mburugu said in
the article.  A neighbor came to aid the farmer  and kill the dying
leopard.  M'Mburugu was mauled by the  animal's claws and received bite
wounds on his wrist. He received  free hospital treatment by impressed 
local authorities.  Hamster sent through British  Postal service  A postman
intercepted a first-class  parcel containing a hamster  in Cambridge,
located in eastern  England, according to a June 24  American Foreign Press
article.  The local postal worker rushed the  moving parcel to a local
veterinarian,  fearing that it contained a rat. Patrick von Heimendahl, a 
veterinarian, said the hamster,  which rescuers named Postie, was  in good
health and should survive.  "It is a very stupid thing to do,"  said Wendy
Barry of.the British  Hamster Association. "With letters  raining down on
it, it would have  been terrified."  The person who mailed the hamster
remains unidentified.  Restaurant to sell fried whale  meat sandwiches  For
380 yen, or $3.50, a Japanese  fast-food chain is offering a new  sandwich
made of whale meat to  customers, according to a June 23  Reuters article. 
Lucky Pierrot, a restaurant chain  in Japan started selling fried minke 
whale burgers.  "The taste and texture are  somewhere between beef and
fish,"  restaurant manager Miku Oh said.  "People (here) have a long
history  of eating whale, so customers are  looking forward to trying it."
The whale meat is not coming  from recent hunting activities, Oh  said. The
restaurants are using meat from whales originally caught and  killed for
scientific experiments.  - Compiled by Coree Naslund LAKEWAY  nDEEAHIITI VI
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     Western Front 2005-06-28 - Page 4



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   4 • THE WESTERN FRONT FEATURES/ACCENT JUNE 28,2005 
Noon concert series outside the PAC provides summer entertainment from
artists around the country  COREE NASLUND/The Western Front  The bluegrass
and world-beat band Spoonshine perform Wednesday, as part of the Summer
Noon Concert Series. Band members from top to bottom, Jacob Navarro,  James
Harper and William Cook. Summer  ^ NO Oil Concert  Series 
^^(^irSl^liirliK^^  SBJiHiS^KSiHift  BY COREE NASLUND  The Western     
Front  Pedestrian" traffic rftows"in-the -^king  Union around the rows of
seats filled  with concert-goers. The VU is packed  with faculty, students,
children and community  members on a gray Wednesday afternoon. The 
atmosphere is relaxed but upbeat — much like  the live
music. Children from Western's Child  Development Center dance to the
pulsating  beats, while adults nod their heads or tap their  toes
approvingly.  The four members of Spoonshine, the first  of six bands
participating in Western's annual Summer Noon Concert Series, soak up the 
atmosphere their audience creates. Out of  Anacortes, Spoonshine members
Matt Ambrose,  31, William Cook, 27, James Harper, 29 and Jacob  Navarro,
30, played a total of 11 instruments,  including the guitar, upright bass,
keyboard and  mandolin, during their set last Wednesday.  "I liked (the
concert)," said Mika Kawakami,  a Western senior and information desk 
attendant  at the VU. "It was a different style of music than  what I
typically hear, so it was fun to listen to."  Vocalist, guitarist and
mandolin player  Navarro, describes their sound as "world-grass" 
— folk music heavily influenced by music from  around
the world. Some songs are melodic, with  notes from a soothing saxophone,
while some  are more rhythmic, with pulsating beats from  African tribal
drums.  "I try  to find music that will appeal cross-generationally,"  said
Lisa Rosenberg, Western's  student activities coordinator and Summer  Noon
Concert Series planner.  Rosenberg, who has been in charge of the concert
series for the past 14 years, said she  thought Wednesday's concert, which
would  have been outside in front of the Performing Arts  Center if the
weather was decent, was a success.  Rosenberg said she books acts she
thinks  Western's community would enjoy listening  to, or is contacted by,
potential artists. Each  summer,' she sets the line up of artists, some of 
whom travel from across the world to perform  on Western's campus.  "I try
not to repeat too many artists too often,"  Rosenberg said. "I want to 
make sure everyone  who wants to participate gets a chance."  For the next
five weeks, the performances   will take place every Wednesday outside the 
Performing Arts Center, or in the VU lobby if  rainy weather  occurs. 
Local Bellingham band The Eskalators will  perform June 29. The band has
seven members,  and  plays Jamaican, British and American ska  and reggae,
Rosenberg said.  Tacoma resident Vicci Martinez, 20, a pop-rock  artist,
will perform for a second time at  Western later in the series.  "She
played  last year and got a great crowd  response so I thought I'd bring
her back this  year," Rosenberg said.  On July 13, a Seattle quintet,
Flowmotion,  will perform. Rosenberg said the self-described  "world-funk"
band combines funk, jazz and  Latin-influenced beats in their music. 
• Making their second appearance at Western, the Mishras,
Indian sitar masters are  promoting their newest album "Raga Cycle,"  said
spokeswoman Dudley Everson, owner  of Sounding of the Planet, a Bellingham 
independent record label that produced the  new album.  The father and son,
from Benares, India,  are the sixth and seventh generation sitar  players
in their family, Everson said. The duo,  accompanied by three other
musicians, will  play traditional-style Raga music.  "(The concert series)
provides a  unique opportunity for people to see their  performances,"
Rosenberg said. "It's not too  often people (locally) would have a chance
to  see them."  Maggie's Fury, a Bellingham-based quintet,  will play their
modem version of traditional  Celtic and folk music July 27 in the final
concert  of the series.  The student services and activities fee that  all
full- time Western students pay funds the  concert series. This year's
concert budget was  approximately $4,200, Rosenberg said. The  money covers
the performers' fees, hospitality  services; technical support for the
sound  equipment, publicity and promotion.  Rosenberg said the series
provides students  and other  attendees an opportunity to see bands  they
haven't been exposed to.  PHOTOS COURTESY OF  THE ESKALATORS (LEFT)  AND
THE MISHRAS INDIAN  SITAR MASTERS (RIGHT).  The Eskalators are scheduled 
to play June 29 and  The Misharas on July 20.  The Summer noon concert 
series will feature  both performers.  The concerts will  be located in
front of the  Performing Arts Center.  "(The concert series) provides a
unique opportunity for people to see their performances. It's not too often
people (locally)  would have a  chance to see them."  LISA ROSENBERG 
Student Activities Coordinator and Summer Noon Concert Series Coordinator  
                       



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     Western Front 2005-06-28 - Page 5



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   SPORTS  TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2005 •
WESTERNFRONTONLINE.COM • PAGE 5  %  VIKING FOOTBALL  sive
line coacti so his IQ-yea^  S c h o o l^  letes^a^ during his t 
seye^league;fi^^  TRACK   FIELD  R^IQ Mi cQill L became ^  fpfesMian of
iier  fcliamp^  ffo6lj||^^  *  STP provides wild ride for locals and
students alike  BY RENEE REDEKOP  The Western Front  Riders will need more
than a cup of coffee  to pedal their way through the 26th annual  Seattle
to Portland Bicycle Classic — a  202.25 mile trek. Lungs
of steel, burly legs  and enough willpower to fuel a gas-guzzling  sport
utility vehicle are essential. Eight thousand  bicyclists will be chatting,
sweating and  eating energy-packed bananas for     an entire  weekend, en
route to finishing the race.  As the largest multi-day race event in the 
Northwest, the Classic continues to attract  thousands of athletes and
spectators.  Race participants consume an average  of 11,250 bananas, 7,900
pounds of watermelon,  12,000 Cliff bars and 13,250 bagels  over two days
each year, said Carry Porter,  the marketing director for the Cascade
Bicycle  Club.  Not only are Western participants preparing  for July 9 and
10, when the event begins,  but members of Bellingham's growing  cyclist
community are also looking forward  to the trek. Although participants'
ages and  occupations vary, riders in the race have a  passion for healthy
lifestyles and bike riding  in common, Porter said.  Western Facilities
Management electrician,  Fred Escher, 58, will ride in the race  with his
sons Daniel, 22, and Peter, 26.  "Cycling promotes good health," Escher 
said.  Escher and his sons have  participated in  the bike, run and canoe
Ski to Sea events  for the past four years  and are ready for a new  
challenge, he said.  Riders will leave the  University of Washington  July
9 between 4:45  a.m. and 7:30  a.m. with  one destination
— the  finish line.  Holladay Park in  northeast
Portland will  play host to the "Finish  Line Festival," which  will
feature food, music,  sponsor booths, showers  and first aid.  Like Escher
and his  sons, Western junior Adrian  Pike, 19, will compete  in his first
Seattle to Portland ride this year. Each  year, more than half of  the
riders participating in  the event are first-timers,  Porter said.  "It
will be cool to test  Photo courtesy of the Skagit Bicycle Club  Riders
gather, hydrating, stretching and chatting before last year's Seattle to
Portland race on July 17, 2004.  Courtesy of the Skagit  Bicycle Club  my
endurance, and to share the experience  with so many other riders," Pike
said.  Pike heard about the race from a friend who  was training to ride
the course on his unicycle  this year, he said. "At first I thought he  was
crazy, but he started  .-'me thinking," Pike said.  "If somebody can ride
it  on their unicycle, maybe  I could ride it too."  The race's total
uphill  distance of 30.87 miles  makes the ride a  huge  challenge, Porter
said.  "I'm nervous," Pike  said. "Some people say  that it is really
difficult  and others call it a  breeze."  The Cascade Bicycle  Club
organizes the race,  which can be a one-day  or two- day event, depending 
on the aspirations  and stamina of the  individual cyclist.  After living
in Bell- ingham  for 30 years,  Wendy Longman, 55,  said she is ready to
complete  her second STP with three of her four  sons. Being able to ride
with her college-age  sons who have left home is part,of the  thrill for
Longman, she said.  "What makes it special is doing it with  the long-lost
kids," she said.  Longman's sons, Jameson, 20, and Mark,  31, hope to
finish the ride in one day, and  join the elite 20 percent who finish in
one  day. The Cascade Bicycle Club estimates  that, by averaging a 17.5
mile per hour  pace, riders can complete the race in one  day, Porter said.
 Longman, Jier oldest son, Jesse, 33, and  her daughter-in-law Gina Muia,
31, will  join the family for the ride and make it a  two-day trek.  "On
the second  day you are sore and don't  even want to get back out there,"
Longman  said. "You just do it because everyone else  is doing it."  Riders
spend the night in campgrounds,  private homes, churches and motels along 
the way to Portland, Porter said. Even for  those who are not racing, the
scenic route  through the valleys, forests and farmlands  of western
Washington and Oregon make  the trek worth traveling. Longman said she
never thought she  would participate in a race like this one.  Ironically,
she now hopes to make it a family  tradition, she said.  The support from
other Seattle to Portland  participants also forms a strong bond between 
riders that she enjoys, Longman said.  The youngest rider last year was 1 
year  old and riders came from 38 states, primar-;  ily Washington, Oregon,
California and  Idaho, Porter said. The young ones ri e  tandem with their
parents in a seat with  wheels, Longman said.  "It's more of a  casual ride
where family,  groups, friends go together," WWU cycling  team member Chris
Parrish said. "Most do  it for the accomplishment rather than the 
'competition."  Parrish, 19, who is also a Fairhaven Mountain  Bike Shop
mechanic, said cyclists just  finishing the race is a huge achievement. 
Porter said  the oldest rider this year is  81 years old. Twenty-eight
riders under 10  years old will also participate. "These young riders are
bound to get  hooked to the event," Longman said. "Once  you do it, it's so
fun you have to do it again.  You can never forget how to ride a bike."  In
1979,187 riders participated in the first  Seattle to Portland ride. The
number of participating  riders peaked in 1991 with 10,000  riders, and now
is capped at 8,000 riders.  "Once you've done it, the spokes start  rolling
and a tradition forms," Escher said. 
Aft0nS61lliBroG®™P^ro  ^i^^H^ffi  www.
thewesternfrontonline. com                             



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     Western Front 2005-06-28 - Page 6



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   TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2005 • WESTERNFRONTONLINE.COM
• PAGE 6  Fourth of July another holiday spoiled by
American cuture  With Independence Day only one week away, many Americans
are gearing up for spectacular fireworks displays. While nothing is wrong 
with impressive displays of light and  color, the holiday has become  less
about celebrating freedom and more about the commercialism  that surrounds
it.  Fireworks are incredibly expensive. According to Grucci  Fireworks,
the company that produces fireworks displays for  events such as
presidential inaugurations, state-of-the-art fireworks displays range from
$3,000 for a small light show to $300,000 for a  colossal display. For the
average U.S. family that wants to exhibit a  neighborhood show, it can
expect to spend anywhere from $4.50 for  a basic  roman candle to $130.50
for a multi-shot aerial kit, according  to U.S. Fireworks, an online
fireworks retailer.  Ironically, the one day on which Americans celebrate
their freedom  is strictly government- regulated. State laws restrict the
days fireworks  stands can sell fireworks, what time businesses can sell
them, who  can sell them, and where people can set them off. With the power
 to ban all purchasing and discharging of fireworks, local city and  county
laws are often more restrictive than state laws, according to   the
Municipal Research   Services Center of Washington.  Like Valentine's Day,
the Fourth of July has turned into another  excuse for excessive
commercialism. Clothing retailers, such as  Old Navy, market products
specific to the Fourth of July, which  encourages consumers to buy a new
outfit for the holiday. Retailers  lure customers using these specialty
products. Beer and wine sales  are higher during the Fourth of July weekend
than at almost any other  time during the year, according to a June 2001
CNN.com  article.  This tendency towards consumerism distracts Americans
from  remembering that the Fourth of July is about freedom, not sales. 
Despite the expense and regulation of firework displays, they are  a U.S. 
tradition that brings families and communities together. The  earliest
settlers fired black gunpowder to celebrate holidays, and  Americans have
continued to use the combination of noise of color to commemorate
Independence Day.  While celebrating the nation's independence with
fireworks is historical, the tradition should not justify the danger
associated with  the practice. According to Washington State Fire Marshal's
statistics,  1,110 injuries and fires resulted from fireworks in 2004,
representing a  49 percent increase from the last five years' average of
742 incidents.  The fire marshall's study showed that an estimated $951,133
 in property loss resulted from fireworks-related fires. Of the 535 fire
departments in Washington, only 80 reported having no  fireworks-related
incidents. Americans should continue to celebrate  Independence Day with
enthusiasm and patriotism. But they should  also recognize the holiday for
what it is — a day honoring the freedom  of the United
States.  Frontlines are the opinion of The Western Front editorial board:
Travis  Sherer, Michael Murray, Adam Rudnick, Molly Jensen, Lauren Allain, 
Brittany Greenfield, Bradley Thayer, Lauren Miller and Sarah Berger.  The
Western Front  Editor in Chief: Travis Sherer; Managing Editor: Michael
Murray; Copy  Editors: Molly Jensen, Adam  Rudnick; Photo Editor: Lauren
Allain; News  Editor: Brittany Greenfield; Accent/Features Editor: Lauren
Miller;  Sports/Opinions,Editor: Bradley Thayer; Online Editor: Sarah
Berger;  Staff Photographer: Mike Murray; Cartoonist: Susan Rosenberry;
Adviser:  Tim Pilgrim; Business Manager: Alethea Macomber; Advertising 
Manager: Joel Hall  Staff Reporters: Jessica Alvarado, Rob Ashlock, Brandi
Bratrude,  Dawn Chesbro, Candace Cusano, Shannon. Deveny, Jessica Dignan, 
Kelsey Dosen, Jeff Elder, Stacie Erfle, Daniel Grohl, "Erica Ham, Lindsay 
Hamsik, Tess Hembree, Jacinda Howard, Shannon Hutchison, John  Karabias,
Meron Kelemework, Thomas King, Lane Koivu, Sarah Martin,  Katie Mathis,
Sean McCormick, Scott McDowell, Sean McGrorey,  Ted McGuire, Megan Muldary,
Coree Naslund, Megumi Osawa, Re-nee  Redekop, Susan Rosenberry, Katie
Rothenberger, Anastasia Wright.  Editor's note: The views expressed on The
Western Front opinion  pages are the views of the authors or cartoonists
and are not necessarily  the views of The Western Front staff, managers or
adviser.  And we quote:  "Solutions are not the answer."  Richard Nixon,
former U.S. President  Pitt using "misleading" media for own benefit  BY
SHANNON HUTCHINSON  The Western Front  Brad Pitt's attempts to steer media 
attention away from the public's  speculation about his possible infidelity
 with actress Jennifer Aniston  and toward his humanitarian work  is a
deceptive practice and a misuse  of public relations. The use of the  press
is not subjective, and it is its  responsibility to report news fully  and
without bias.  Brad Pitt's announcement during  a June 7 interview posted
on the E!  Online Web site that he is frustrated  with the press' focus on
his personal  life rather than his humanitarian efforts,  is laughable and
difficult for  the public to sympathize with.  Too often celebrities cry
foul on  the same press that made them famous.  Pitt is another example of 
an over-exposed, self-righteous  star who is trying to steer the press 
toward issues he would like to see  reported on.  According to the E!
Online Web  site, Pitt is the son of a trucking- company  manager and a
high-school  counselor, and graduated  from Kickapoo High School in
Springfield, Mo. According to the  site, Pitt's acting career took off in 
1991, when he played J.D. in the movie "Thelma and Louise."  From his
humble beginnings,  Pitt quickly ascended to the top of  the Hollywood
scene as a result of  roles in the 1990s such as "Interview  with the
Vampire," "Seven"  and "12 Monkeys."  Pitt's marriage to Friends' sitcom 
star Jennifer Aniston in  2000, and the couple's subsequent  separation in
January, earned the  couple considerable column space  in newspapers and
magazines.  The media's speculation on  whether Pitt and actress Angelina 
Jolie are a couple is the latest example  of the actor's
incessantly-covered  life.  Pictures of Pitt and Jolie walking  together on
a beach in Africa  have not done much in the way of  publicity damage
control either.  According to a June 8 ABC.com  news article, photographers
took  pictures of Pitt in April with Jolie  and her son, Maddox, on a beach
 in Kenya after he announced his  separation from Aniston.  Additionally,
the July issue of  W magazine contained a 60-page  feature article on Pitt
and Jolie, titled  "Domestic Bliss." The article  will keep interactions
between the  two at the forefront of the public's  minds for at least
another couple  of weeks.  see PITT, page 7  United States should close
Gitmo to save face  BY J.J. KARABIAS  The Western Front  If the Bush
administration actually  intends to eliminate terrorism  abroad, it should
cut its losses  and dispel the notion that the U.S.  military are
proprietors of human  torment by shutting down the  Guantanamo Bay prison,
cordially  known as Gitmo.  While the terrorist detainee center  at
Guantanamo Bay is no Gulag,  it certainly possesses many of  the unsettling
elements that made  the former Soviet labor camp one  of history's most
notorious human-  rights debacles.  Amid recent FBI reports made  public by
the American Civil Liberties  Union in which prisoners  claimed to have
been severely tortured,  the White House has become  increasingly concerned
about what  has become an international public  relations problem. 
Beginning in 2002, detainees  began publicly complaining  about
mistreatment by U.S. interrogators  at Guantanamo Bay. The  complaints
included charges of  sexual humiliation, severe physical  and mental abuse,
and most  notably, ill-treatment of the Quran  by interrogators.  The
latter, of course, culminated  with riots in Afghanistan after  a May 9
Newsweek article came  out citing an internal military report  in which a
Quran had been  flushed down the toilet by U.S  military interrogators. 
Recent allegations by Amnesty  International, an independent human  rights
organization, accused  Guantanamo Bay of being "the Gulag  of our time,"
and referred to the  United States as "a leading purveyor  and
practitioner" of torture and mistreatment  of prisoners, according to  a 
May 26 Washington Post article.  This barrage of negative press  has
created widespread debate both  in                                         
                           



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     Western Front 2005-06-28 - Page 7



     ----------



  7 • THE WESTERN FRONT OPINIONS JUNE 28,2005  Pitt: The
actor has only brought himself further into the media's spotlight with his
criticisms  A  • CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6  "I cannot get out
of the press," Pitt said  in a June 6 interview with Diane Sawyer on  ABC's
Primetime Live.  Perhaps the cause of  Pitt's problems has  something to do
with his plastering himself  all over the same media he later complains 
about.  In the interview, Pitt also expounded on  his newfound
enlightenment of the pitfalls  of celebrity status.  "It's a strange focus,
isn't it? That my  relationships or relationship mishaps take precedent,"
Pitt said. "I understand it's  about entertainment, but, man, it's
misguided  a bit, isn't it?" Pitt, more than anyone, should know that  his
profession is entertainment. People go  to movies and admire celebrities
because  doing so offers them an escape from the realities  of society. 
When Pitt, one of People magazine's Most  Beautiful People of 2005,
suddenly thrusts  the issue of an African AIDS epidemic into  the public's
faces, obviously people will be  surprised and caught off guard.
•  According to a June 13  American Foreign Press arti- 
Sorrie may argue that Pitt is genuinely interested  in aiding other people
and using his  status to enact positive change in the world.  During a June
12 interview with ABC's  "This Week" broadcast program, Pitt discussed  his
cause. Pitt said the AIDS crisis  • in Ethiopia is a
cause more than  'Pitt, more than an emergenc* a n d t h o u§h t
he  media hardly mention it, the  cle, Pitt directed an interview anyone,
should know epidemic is spreading quickly.  that initially addressed
questions  about his relationship  with Jolie to highlight his experiences 
in Ethiopia, which •  he described as daunting and 
complex. In the middle of the media's narrowly-  focused interest on    
Pitt's interactions  with Jolie, he could have addressed  the issues
head-on, rather than diverting to  a different subject.  that his
profession is  entertainment.'  In the May 14 issue of  Britain's Daily
Mirror, however,  Pitt said Jolie's humanitarian  trips to Africa to visit
AIDS victims  changed his perspective on  life. According to the interview,
Pitt said he  did not know how he could not change after  what he had seen.
 By crediting his involvement with AIDS  awareness and education to Jolie,
Pitt has  done nothing more than imitate her, perhaps  in hopes of finding
common interests through  which the two can spend more time together.  The
tough question is whether Pitt is doing  humanitarian work because he truly
cares, or if his efforts are a last-ditch attempt  to clean up his public
image. Pitt is  an actor so he and his lifestyle are available  for close
examination by tabloid publications  — keeping this in
mind makes Pitt's  sudden humanitarian interests clairvoyant.  In essence,
Pitt has not really accomplished  anything  except providing Americans 
with a distraction from his questionable  lifestyles. People do not seem to
care  about the issue of AIDS any more than before.  In fact, Americans
still seem to care  more about staying up to date on the intricacies  of
Brad Pitt's life, than the well-being  of a third world country.  Gitmo:
Detention center only fuels growing Anti-American sentiments around the
world CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6  to those of the world's most nefarious
regimes,  rather than a country that  endorses  human rights. After all,
eliminating ruthless  Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein was part of  the U.S.
rationale for war in Iraq.  The U.S. military has been able to avoid  being
subject to the Geneva Conventions,  citing a statute that excludes opposing
forces  not wearing uniforms clearly identifying them as an official
military from the stipulations  of the conventions.  Guantanamo Bay; has
also become a recruiting  tool for Islamic fundamentalists 
internationally. Abu Ghraib made headlines  last year when the Washington
Post published  photographs of American soldiers  torturing Iraqi
prisoners, which caused an  internationaLupr ar.-' 
•Television networks, such as Al-Jazeera  and other Arab
media outlets, have placed  emphasis on Guantanamo Bay and the Abu.  Ghraib
prison scandal. This type  of media  coverage inspires in potential
terrorists an  increased hatred toward the United States  among a growing
population that already  sees the U.S. as an imperialistic nation meddling 
in Middle Eastern politics for its own  strategic, economic and political
gains.  U.S. Attorney General Alberto Gonzalez,  who  is responsible for
the interpretation  and application of the Geneva Conventions  and U.S.
military law, must consider not  only the fundamental importance of respect
 for human dignity, but also the strategic advantage  doing so would
provide the United  States from those who use abuses at Guantanamo Bay as
justification for abhorrent  actions.  By allowing suspected terrorists the
protections  of the Geneva Conventions, Gonzalez  would send a message that
the United  States respects all human beings to the international 
community, and also quiet the  critics who use bad press to fuel violence
against the United States. .  Those who support the detention center  argue
that the United States treats imprisoned  suspected terrorists with ample
respect  in comparison to prisons around the world,  such as those in
Syria, Egypt and Iraq.  These places were referred to by Durbin in  his
June 14 floor speech to the Senate. .  "The United States, which each year
issues  a human rights report, holding the  world accountable for
outrageous conduct,  is engaged in the same outrageous conduct  when it
comes to these  prisoners," he said.  This, however, is a fundamentally
flawed  argument. Democracies should not justify bad behavior with worse
behavior. Believing  that the U.S. military's treatment of  prisoners is
proper because it does not possess  rape rooms is absurd. Those in charge 
at the detention center merely physically  and mentally torture detainees. 
This problem is an easy fix — charge and  prosecute
Guantanamo Bay criminals, then  the U.S. will not have to keep the prison
open.  The prisoners who are actually guilty will  serve as any other
maximum-security prisoner  would in a U.S. detention center. Logically,  it
would be impossible for a successful prison  break to happen! Prisoners at
Gitmo who are found innocent of particpating in terrorist activities  would
hypothetically return to their  countries of origin  in this situation. 
The argument for shutting down Gitmo is  two-dimensional. First, if the
United States feels compelled to lecture the rest of the  world about
democratic ideals, then it must  exemplify and carry out those same
principles.  Secondly, the United States has a  major image problem
throughout the world  right now, specifically in the Middle East,  which
inspires new terrorists every time  the media reports on the continuing
abuse  at Guantanamo Bay.  Closing the Guantanamo Bay prison  would strip
those people hostile toward the  United States of a significant amount of
the  fodder they use to recruit and  carry out terrorist  actions against
this country every day  the Guantanamo Bay detention center remains  open. 
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     Western Front 2005-06-28 - Page 8



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  JUNE 28,2005 NEWS THE WESTERN FRONT • 8  Fireworks:
Celebrators purchase variety of fireworks  on reservations, use
restrictions apply  . CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1  of Commerce and Industry will
exhibit a  fireworks show over Bellingham Bay com-  Jmencing at dusk July
4.  While the Bellingham Bay show is the only  official public fireworks
display in Bellingham,  Flannelly said the city of Blaine will also sponsor
a fireworks show beginning at  10:15 p.m. July 4 at Blaine Harbor.  : Under
Washington's municipal code,  fireworks, including mortar-type,
missile-type,  firecrackers, salutes, chasers and sky rockets are illegal
and highly dangerous,  said Ron Richard, Bellingham Fire Department  fire
inspector.  The Washington State Fire Marshal,  Samuel Pierre, conducted a
statewide study  with fire departments and hospitals this  year and found
that 1,110 fireworks-related  injuries occurred in 2004. These injuries
include second-degree and third-degree  burns, and traumatic eye, finger
and hand  injuries, Flannelly said.  ; "The number of fire incidents in
Washington  fluctuates, determined by Mother  Nature," Flannelly said. "If
the damp  weather pattern holds out, we won't have  very many this year." 
: Fireworks caused two house fires in Whatcom  County during June,
Flannelly said.  The fire that caused greater damages occurred  June 19 at
1500 block of Burk Road  in a barn on an active dairy farm, where four
13-year-old boys lit illegal fireworks and set  fire to the establishment,
Whatcom County  Fire Marshal Warner Webb said.  He said the other incident
occured June  12 at 3400 block of Emma Road, where children allegedly
caught a house's roof on  fire while playing with  bottle rockets. Webb 
said the incident is under  invesitgation. The  two fires resulted in 
$200,000 in collective  damages, Flannelly  said. Consumers can  choose
from a larger  selection of fireworks  than is available in  Washington on
American  Indian reservations,  Lintz said: A  separate set of laws 
governs the reservations, including Lummi  Nation and Nooksack Nation. 
Buyers, however, should take heed of  Washington laws, which legally
require  customers to use all fireworks within the  reservation
jurisdiction where they purchased Bellingham Municipal Code finds th 
followinu fireworks devices illegal:  -Informatioit courtesy
^BrimflitKHell^s-:  BdUHgHamVireBfpartmhitpHbKcl^n^oi^  the fireworks, he
said.  "We respect the right of the Lummi Nation  and Nooksack Nation to
sell whatever  fireworks they wish inside their borders," Flannelly said.
"However, Washington state  law requires that those fireworks must remain 
inside their jurisdiction."  Everyone planning to enjoy July 4 with 
fireworks can abide by three precautionary recommendations to  reduce the
risk of injury  from improper or  poor use of fireworks,  Flannelly said.
To ensure the fireworks  are safe, people  should only handle  legal
fireworks.  Fireworks are legal for use in Bellingham  if purchased within 
the city's limits, Flannelly  said.  "If the fireworks  are purchased
within  the county and city limits, they are legal,"  Flannelly said.
"Those establishments are licensed and are not gong to sell you illegal 
fireworks like openers, such as sky rockets  or bottle rockets,  which
travel a significant  distance in the air and then explode
— very  dangerous. People can create house fires  this
way."  Fireworks users should select an area  where the ground is saturated
with rain or water for fireworks use and shoot them away  from houses, cars
and people to ensure that  the fireworks' sparks do not ignite dry sur-. 
roundings and spread fire, he said.  "Fireworks such as fountain fireworks
that  create a small shower of sparkly and colorful  sparks are the safest
kind of fireworks  available," Flannelly said.  Lastly, he said adults and
parents must rigorously  supervise all children who use or are  in the
presence of fireworks.  "Fireworks are very enticing and make children 
want to go over and touch  them," Flannelly  said. "Burns on a child is
something you  definitely do not want to see or hear." Fireworks burn to
temperatures up to  1,200 degrees Fahrenheit, even with the  most basic of
fireworks such as sparklers,  Flannelly said. If a child touched the
firework,  he or she would suffer from, at the minimum, second-degree burns
with blisters  and even third-degree burns with skin  charring, he said.
"Our best recommendation to stay safe  is not to use fireworks and instead
go down  to Bellingham Bay and watch the fireworks  there," Flannelly said.
 Sculptures: Five new artists' work to adorn campus CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 
' When the gifts will arrive  at Western's campus is at the  Wright's
discretion, Clark-  Langager said.  The Wrights are currently  enjoying the
sculptures in their  private collection at their Seattle  home, which they
are planning  to move out of in two years,  Wright said. At that time, the 
Wrights will send the sculptures  to Western's campus.  The gift will add
five new  artists to Western's collection:  Scott Burton, Jenny Holzer, 
Ulrich Riickriem, Joel Shapiro  and Meg Webster, Clark-Langager  said.  !
The donations reflect Wright's  personal preference for postwar  American
sculpture. The  new artists will compliment  the postwar American ^tyle of 
the existing pieces in     Western's  collection, Wright said.  "Normanno
Column," a new  sculpture by artist Beverly Pepper,  will  be added to
Western's  collection and is similar to the  piece "Normanno Wedge," also 
by Pepper, located in Haskell  Plaza near Arntzen Hall, Clark-  Langager
said.  "Mindseye," a 53-inch-high  steel piece with a moving circular 
center, will be the second  sculpture by di Suvero in Western's collection,
Clark-Langager  said. She said she and the Facilities  Management directors
are  considering  placing the new di  Suvero work in the lobby of the 
Performing Arts Center.  Clark-Langager and Rick Benner, Western assistant
director  of planning, will examine  what new buildings the  university is
constructing and  which ones it is renovating in  order to find places for
the new  sculptures on campus, she said.  Clark-Langager also works  with
Facilities Management  Director Tim Wynn and Assistant Director of
Operations Bill  Managan to consider the present  condition of the campus 
as well as the size, weight and  fragile materials of the new  works, she
said.  "The placement of the works  is very complicated," Clark-  Langager
said. "The context of  the piece is very important in  determining where it
will fit in  on campus."  The only other sculpture donation  from the
Virginia Wright  Fund to a Washington university  is Barnett Newman's
"Obelisk,"  which the Wrights donated to  the University of Washington, 
Clark-Langager said.  Waterfront: Committee evaluates  proposals for
development of property  The committee will also need to  devise a plan for
transportation, most  likely a shuttle bus, to guarantee students  have the
ability to easily access  both campuses, she said.  Transportation to the
area is not yet  an issue, however, because the expansion  is still in
early stages of development. After the committee makes  a decision for the
use of the space, it  can solve the transportation problem, Schoenfeld
said.  Frazier said he predicted the committee  will finish reviewing the
proposals  by this fall, and will decide  which ideas to eliminate and
which  to consider pursuing. The committee  will dismiss  some proposals
due to  impracticality and the possibility of  high cost, he said.  "The
process has begun to face reality  and we'll see which (proposals)  work
best and which ones don't,"  Frazier said. CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 " 
remodeling process of the waterfront  and offered her the idea of
expansion.  The port put more pressure on  Western last fall to make a
decision  about whether the school would use  the land by encouraging the
university  to accept submission proposals  for ideas, Frazier said.  The
extra space is not necessary for  Western now, but it provides the
university  with an opportunity to expand  in the future, Schoenfeld said. 
When reviewing the submissions,  the committee is looking for proposals 
that will complement the main  campus by incorporating outdoor  sculptures
and grassy areas into the  plan for the space, she said.  "We want
something more than a  brick building with our name on it,"  Schoenfeld
said.  E ''x;-:'T;-E-^  %^ss^  Communications Block B  y
^I^Hllilillllilliil  ^ ijiliB  "  ISJlS^B^^BBiBii^Bilim Natural Sciences B 
650-3650  ilearn@wwu.edu  405 32nd Street, Suite 209
ExtencledEd.wwu.edu/ilearn  AA [-0 Instiuiiion  I WESTERN  WASHINGTON
UNIVERSITY  A special ultraviolet cooers sake* it  possible to see the
Underlying skin  damage dose by th» tan. And since 1 in-5  
American* till develop ekin cancer. in  their lifetime, what better reason
to  always use sunscreen, wear protective  clothing and use coanwn sense. 
fAAK  AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY  $ 8 8 , 4  6 2 . P E RM j
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